Post-Discharge Pain Intensity and Functional Status of Patients Who Presented to the Emergency Department in Pain

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163042
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Post-Discharge Pain Intensity and Functional Status of Patients Who Presented to the Emergency Department in Pain
Abstract:
Post-Discharge Pain Intensity and Functional Status of Patients Who Presented to the Emergency Department in Pain
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2004
Author:Chan, Garrett, RN, MS, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, San Francisco
Title:Assistant Clinical Professor
Contact Address:2 Koret Way, Box 0610, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0610, USA
Contact Telephone:(415) 502-7026
Co-Authors:Martha L. Neighbor, MD; Larry L. LaBossiere (LT/NC/USN), RN, MS, CEN; Kathleen A. Puntillo, RN, DNSc, FAAN

Purpose: Little is known about how discharge interventions affect pain relief, produce bothersome side
effects, or how continued pain interferes with functional status of patients after discharge from the emergency
department (ED). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the discharge pain management interventions
after an ED visit and to investigate how pain intensity influenced functional status of patients
who presented to the ED with a chief complaint of pain.
Design/Setting: This prospective, descriptive study was conducted at two Level I trauma center hospitals
in California.
Sample: While in the ED, 29 patients consented to participate in follow-up phone calls from a larger sample
of 180 subjects participating in a study investigating the experiences of pain and pain management in
the ED. The 29 subjects had presented to the ED with chief complaints of abdominal (n = 8), chronic (n =
10), abscess (n = 2), and trauma-related pain (n = 9).
Methodology: As part of the larger study, the study patients reported pain intensity upon ED discharge
using a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale (NRS) (0 = no pain, 10 = worst possible pain). Follow-up data were
collected via telephone interview an average of 72 hours after discharge. Questionnaire items assessed
aspects of pain including pain intensity (0 to 10 NRS), amount of pain relief (0 to 10 NRS; 0 = no relief, 10
= complete relief), how bothersome the side effects of medications were (0 to 4 Likert, 0 = not bothered,
4 = extremely bothered), and functional interference due to pain (0 to10 NRS; 0 = no interference, 10 =
severe interference).
Results: Upon discharge, patients reported moderate pain intensity that had not decreased significantly at
the time of the home interview (4.3 ± 2.4 versus 3.9 ± 3.1, p = .359). However, most patients (79%) used
ED-prescribed medications and reported a high level of relief (7.2 ± 2.1).The most common side effect
was sleepiness (34%), but the subjects were not bothered by this side effect (0.9 ± 1.4). Pain also interfered
with patients' ability to work (7.3 ± 3.8), to go outside for social activities (6.5 ± 4.1), and to walk
(5.0 ± 4.1).
Conclusions: Pain intensity within 72. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePost-Discharge Pain Intensity and Functional Status of Patients Who Presented to the Emergency Department in Painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163042-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Post-Discharge Pain Intensity and Functional Status of Patients Who Presented to the Emergency Department in Pain</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chan, Garrett, RN, MS, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Clinical Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2 Koret Way, Box 0610, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0610, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(415) 502-7026</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">garrett.chan@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Martha L. Neighbor, MD; Larry L. LaBossiere (LT/NC/USN), RN, MS, CEN; Kathleen A. Puntillo, RN, DNSc, FAAN<br/><br/></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Little is known about how discharge interventions affect pain relief, produce bothersome side<br/>effects, or how continued pain interferes with functional status of patients after discharge from the emergency<br/>department (ED). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the discharge pain management interventions<br/>after an ED visit and to investigate how pain intensity influenced functional status of patients<br/>who presented to the ED with a chief complaint of pain.<br/>Design/Setting: This prospective, descriptive study was conducted at two Level I trauma center hospitals<br/>in California.<br/>Sample: While in the ED, 29 patients consented to participate in follow-up phone calls from a larger sample<br/>of 180 subjects participating in a study investigating the experiences of pain and pain management in<br/>the ED. The 29 subjects had presented to the ED with chief complaints of abdominal (n = 8), chronic (n =<br/>10), abscess (n = 2), and trauma-related pain (n = 9).<br/>Methodology: As part of the larger study, the study patients reported pain intensity upon ED discharge<br/>using a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale (NRS) (0 = no pain, 10 = worst possible pain). Follow-up data were<br/>collected via telephone interview an average of 72 hours after discharge. Questionnaire items assessed<br/>aspects of pain including pain intensity (0 to 10 NRS), amount of pain relief (0 to 10 NRS; 0 = no relief, 10<br/>= complete relief), how bothersome the side effects of medications were (0 to 4 Likert, 0 = not bothered,<br/>4 = extremely bothered), and functional interference due to pain (0 to10 NRS; 0 = no interference, 10 =<br/>severe interference).<br/>Results: Upon discharge, patients reported moderate pain intensity that had not decreased significantly at<br/>the time of the home interview (4.3 &plusmn; 2.4 versus 3.9 &plusmn; 3.1, p = .359). However, most patients (79%) used<br/>ED-prescribed medications and reported a high level of relief (7.2 &plusmn; 2.1).The most common side effect<br/>was sleepiness (34%), but the subjects were not bothered by this side effect (0.9 &plusmn; 1.4). Pain also interfered<br/>with patients' ability to work (7.3 &plusmn; 3.8), to go outside for social activities (6.5 &plusmn; 4.1), and to walk<br/>(5.0 &plusmn; 4.1).<br/>Conclusions: Pain intensity within 72. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:38:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:38:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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