The Effect of Music on Pain, Anxiety, and Cardiac Reactivity in Emergency Department Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163044
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Music on Pain, Anxiety, and Cardiac Reactivity in Emergency Department Patients
Abstract:
The Effect of Music on Pain, Anxiety, and Cardiac Reactivity in Emergency Department Patients
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2004
Author:Evanovich Zavotsky, Kathleen, MS, RN, CCRN, CEN, CNS, C
P.I. Institution Name:Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
Title:Clinical Nurse Specialist, Emergency Department
Contact Address:1 Robert Wood Johnson Place, New Brunswick, NJ, 08903, USA
Contact Telephone:(732) 937-8688
Purpose: Over 90 million Americans seek emergency care annually. Half of these patients are classified as
urgent or non-urgent leading to prolonged waiting times contributing to higher levels of anxiety and pain.
ED staff attempt to assist patients by providing diversional activity such as televisions, newspapers, and
music therapy. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of music on pain, anxiety, and cardiac
reactivity in ED patients.
Design: This quasi-experimental study was designed with a pretest/posttest design.
Setting: This study was conducted in a 48-bed Level I university hospital ED with 70,000 visits per year in
the northeast.
Sample: The ED sample consisted of fifty self-referral, cognitively intact, English-speaking men (N = 18)
and women (N = 32) who were 18 to 81 years old and who did not receive analgesics throughout the
study. The sample included 98% urgent and 2% non-urgent ED patients.
Methodology: Following a triage assessment, subjects were approached by the principal investigator,
informed consent was obtained, and basic demographic data recorded. The subjects were given three tools
prior to listening to their music of choice. The Numeric Rating Score (NRS) 0 (no pain) - 10 (worst pain)
was used to evaluate pain pre-music. The Spielberger State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T) was used to
measure trait anxiety (reliability coefficient, r = .90). State anxiety was measured using the STAI-S (pre
STAI-S r = .93, post STAI-S r = .90). Both tools are a 20-item questionnaire, which is scored from one
(almost never) to four (almost always). Scores range from 20 to 80. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR)
were taken by the researcher pre-music. Participants listened to music for a minimum of 30 minutes. The
STAI-S, NRS, BP, and HR were obtained post-music by the researcher.
Results: The paired t-test (alpha = .05) was used to compare pre- and post-music pain, anxiety, and cardiac
reactivity. A significant decrease in pain (p < .0001), anxiety (p = 0.006) and systolic blood pressure (SBP)
(p = .05) occurred post-music. There were no significant differences in heart rate (p = .37) or diastolic
blood pressure measurements (p = .85).
Conclusions: Pain, anxiety, and SBP (borderline) were significantly decreased in this population. This
study proved to be feasible for use in the emergency department as demonstrated by the ease of recruitment,
acceptability of the intervention, and no early withdraws from the study. Offering ED patients a
choice of music may help decrease pain, anxiety, and SBP that could positively affect outcomes such as
improving patient education, decreasing use of narcotic analgesics, and decreasing length of stay.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Music on Pain, Anxiety, and Cardiac Reactivity in Emergency Department Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163044-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Music on Pain, Anxiety, and Cardiac Reactivity in Emergency Department Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Evanovich Zavotsky, Kathleen, MS, RN, CCRN, CEN, CNS, C</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Specialist, Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1 Robert Wood Johnson Place, New Brunswick, NJ, 08903, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(732) 937-8688</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kathy.zavotsky@rwjuh.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Over 90 million Americans seek emergency care annually. Half of these patients are classified as<br/>urgent or non-urgent leading to prolonged waiting times contributing to higher levels of anxiety and pain.<br/>ED staff attempt to assist patients by providing diversional activity such as televisions, newspapers, and<br/>music therapy. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of music on pain, anxiety, and cardiac<br/>reactivity in ED patients.<br/>Design: This quasi-experimental study was designed with a pretest/posttest design.<br/>Setting: This study was conducted in a 48-bed Level I university hospital ED with 70,000 visits per year in<br/>the northeast.<br/>Sample: The ED sample consisted of fifty self-referral, cognitively intact, English-speaking men (N = 18)<br/>and women (N = 32) who were 18 to 81 years old and who did not receive analgesics throughout the<br/>study. The sample included 98% urgent and 2% non-urgent ED patients.<br/>Methodology: Following a triage assessment, subjects were approached by the principal investigator,<br/>informed consent was obtained, and basic demographic data recorded. The subjects were given three tools<br/>prior to listening to their music of choice. The Numeric Rating Score (NRS) 0 (no pain) - 10 (worst pain)<br/>was used to evaluate pain pre-music. The Spielberger State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T) was used to<br/>measure trait anxiety (reliability coefficient, r = .90). State anxiety was measured using the STAI-S (pre<br/>STAI-S r = .93, post STAI-S r = .90). Both tools are a 20-item questionnaire, which is scored from one<br/>(almost never) to four (almost always). Scores range from 20 to 80. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR)<br/>were taken by the researcher pre-music. Participants listened to music for a minimum of 30 minutes. The<br/>STAI-S, NRS, BP, and HR were obtained post-music by the researcher.<br/>Results: The paired t-test (alpha = .05) was used to compare pre- and post-music pain, anxiety, and cardiac<br/>reactivity. A significant decrease in pain (p &lt; .0001), anxiety (p = 0.006) and systolic blood pressure (SBP)<br/>(p = .05) occurred post-music. There were no significant differences in heart rate (p = .37) or diastolic<br/>blood pressure measurements (p = .85).<br/>Conclusions: Pain, anxiety, and SBP (borderline) were significantly decreased in this population. This<br/>study proved to be feasible for use in the emergency department as demonstrated by the ease of recruitment,<br/>acceptability of the intervention, and no early withdraws from the study. Offering ED patients a<br/>choice of music may help decrease pain, anxiety, and SBP that could positively affect outcomes such as<br/>improving patient education, decreasing use of narcotic analgesics, and decreasing length of stay.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:38:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:38:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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