How Hispanic Mothers Prevent Unintentional Injuries in Pre-School Children - a Pilot Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163045
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How Hispanic Mothers Prevent Unintentional Injuries in Pre-School Children - a Pilot Study
Abstract:
How Hispanic Mothers Prevent Unintentional Injuries in Pre-School Children - a Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2004
Author:Gallagher, Martina, MSN, RN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Title:Doctoral Candidate
Contact Address:7703 Floyd Curl Drive, Mail Code 7950, San Antonio, TX, 78229, USA
Contact Telephone:(210) 843-0496
Co-Authors:Sara Gil, PhD; Elizabeth Reifsnyder, RNC, PhD, WHNP
Purpose: In the state of Texas, unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death and disability in children
under the age of five. It is unknown what Hispanic mothers do to prevent injuries from happening to
their preschool children. Gaining this knowledge is important for emergency nurses since it would allow
them to plan culturally sensitive anticipatory guidance during ED visit. The main goal of this pilot is to test
ethnographic questions to ascertain if they tap into child health protecting practices used by mothers of
Hispanic descent. The findings will help design future research studies and develop health promotion and
injury prevention programs.
Design: There is limited literature reflecting current knowledge of the types of cultural practices used by
Hispanic mothers to prevent injuries in children. Therefore it was determined that an ethnographic study
would facilitate the acquisition of this knowledge.
Setting: This study was conducted in the community of San Antonio, TX where there are 671,394 (58.7 %
of total population) individuals of Hispanic descent and 13.6% are children under the age of five.
Sample: Four women self identified as of Hispanic descent, who had at least two children, with one under
the age of five were asked to participate in this pilot. The women were recruited from various community
settings. Since the purpose of this pilot was to test the interview questions, only four subjects were used in
the pilot.
Methodology: The investigator conducted audiotaped, semi-structured interviews in the homes of the participants.
An interview guide was used during the interview, yet the interview process was iterative. Tapes
were transcribed verbatim by a bilingual/bicultural trained transcriptionist and analyzed in the participant's
language of choice. Codes and themes extracted from the interview in Spanish were translated into
English. Since the purpose of this pilot was to test the ethnographic questions, trustworthiness of the data
was limited to and established by the use of an audit trail by an expert qualitative nursing researcher.
Preliminary Results: The women in the study had clear views of how to prevent injuries in their children.
Controlling a child's environment by childproofing the home, using car seats, maternal watchfulness,
and vigilance by "La Virgen" (religious beliefs) were the most common behaviors used by the four participants.
Preliminary Conclusions: Hispanic mothers in this pilot study appeared to use injury prevention strategies
recommended by experts. They also strongly believed that their own watchfulness and "La Virgen" vigilance
was the main way of protecting their children. Abiding by the law and monetary fines were also
motivators for car seat use. These preliminary findings show the need to evaluate child injury prevention
practices currently used at home during ED visits in order to establish what mothers are actually implementing.
Funding: NIH/NINR F31 NR 08174.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow Hispanic Mothers Prevent Unintentional Injuries in Pre-School Children - a Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163045-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">How Hispanic Mothers Prevent Unintentional Injuries in Pre-School Children - a Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gallagher, Martina, MSN, RN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7703 Floyd Curl Drive, Mail Code 7950, San Antonio, TX, 78229, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(210) 843-0496</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gallagher@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sara Gil, PhD; Elizabeth Reifsnyder, RNC, PhD, WHNP<br/></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: In the state of Texas, unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death and disability in children<br/>under the age of five. It is unknown what Hispanic mothers do to prevent injuries from happening to<br/>their preschool children. Gaining this knowledge is important for emergency nurses since it would allow<br/>them to plan culturally sensitive anticipatory guidance during ED visit. The main goal of this pilot is to test<br/>ethnographic questions to ascertain if they tap into child health protecting practices used by mothers of<br/>Hispanic descent. The findings will help design future research studies and develop health promotion and<br/>injury prevention programs.<br/>Design: There is limited literature reflecting current knowledge of the types of cultural practices used by<br/>Hispanic mothers to prevent injuries in children. Therefore it was determined that an ethnographic study<br/>would facilitate the acquisition of this knowledge.<br/>Setting: This study was conducted in the community of San Antonio, TX where there are 671,394 (58.7 %<br/>of total population) individuals of Hispanic descent and 13.6% are children under the age of five.<br/>Sample: Four women self identified as of Hispanic descent, who had at least two children, with one under<br/>the age of five were asked to participate in this pilot. The women were recruited from various community<br/>settings. Since the purpose of this pilot was to test the interview questions, only four subjects were used in<br/>the pilot.<br/>Methodology: The investigator conducted audiotaped, semi-structured interviews in the homes of the participants.<br/>An interview guide was used during the interview, yet the interview process was iterative. Tapes<br/>were transcribed verbatim by a bilingual/bicultural trained transcriptionist and analyzed in the participant's<br/>language of choice. Codes and themes extracted from the interview in Spanish were translated into<br/>English. Since the purpose of this pilot was to test the ethnographic questions, trustworthiness of the data<br/>was limited to and established by the use of an audit trail by an expert qualitative nursing researcher.<br/>Preliminary Results: The women in the study had clear views of how to prevent injuries in their children.<br/>Controlling a child's environment by childproofing the home, using car seats, maternal watchfulness,<br/>and vigilance by &quot;La Virgen&quot; (religious beliefs) were the most common behaviors used by the four participants.<br/>Preliminary Conclusions: Hispanic mothers in this pilot study appeared to use injury prevention strategies<br/>recommended by experts. They also strongly believed that their own watchfulness and &quot;La Virgen&quot; vigilance<br/>was the main way of protecting their children. Abiding by the law and monetary fines were also<br/>motivators for car seat use. These preliminary findings show the need to evaluate child injury prevention<br/>practices currently used at home during ED visits in order to establish what mothers are actually implementing.<br/>Funding: NIH/NINR F31 NR 08174.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:38:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:38:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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