2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163047
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Nurses' Role in Triage in a Swedish Emergency Department
Abstract:
A Nurses' Role in Triage in a Swedish Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2004
Author:Goransson, Katarina, RN, BSc, MMSc
P.I. Institution Name:Orebro University
Title:PhD-student
Contact Address:Department of Caring Sciences, Orebro, 70182, Sweden
Co-Authors:Anna Ehrenberg, Margareta Ehnfors

Purpose: The triage nurses' roles, responsibilities, and autonomy vary throughout the world. The overall
aim of the study was to describe how triage-related tasks were organized and performed in Swedish emergency
departments. The specific issues addressed in this abstract are the nurses' roles, responsibilities and
autonomy during triage.
Design: A descriptive survey design to identify how emergency department triage was organized and performed
in Swedish hospitals was used.
Setting: Swedish emergency departments representative of geographic location and type of hospital.
Sample: All emergency department managers in Sweden (n = 79) were invited to participate in the study.
Sixty-nine nurse managers (87%) agreed to complete telephone interviews with the investigator. Approval
from Orebro University ethics committee was obtained.
Methodology: A structured interview guide, developed for the study, consisted of thirty-six items that covered
four areas: demographic data, personnel working in the emergency department, knowledge of legislation
about triage, and use of decision support and acuity rating scales. The content validity of the instrument
was confirmed by earlier triage studies.
Results: The greatest chance of being initially addressed by a nurse in the emergency department was during
evening shifts for both ambulance-arriving (52/68) and non-ambulance-arriving (24/68) patients.
Regardless of time of day and patients' way of presenting, nurses in all (69) emergency departments were
responsible for assessing patients' chief complaints and deciding to order EKGs. However, other kinds of
examinations and responsibility for further assessment varied. Complete 24-hour coverage of designated
triage nurses was provided by five emergency departments for ambulance-arriving patients and by fourteen
emergency departments for non-ambulance-arriving patients. Twenty-four (35%) emergency departments
entrusted the designated triage nurses to refer health care-seeking patients to another caregiver;
however, denying patients' access to the emergency department was not allowed in 19 emergency departments.
Conclusions: The low use of designated triage nurses in Swedish emergency departments 24 hours per
day shows a potential weakness in health care access. Swedish health care-seeking behaviors are similar to
other developed countries and waiting times in emergency departments are tending to grow longer, indicating
the increased need for well-trained designated triage nurses. Research findings indicate that nurses'
autonomy in the triage process varies considerably among Swedish emergency departments and that nurses
make triage decisions based on varying kinds of data. Importantly, some of these decisions may impact
patient safety. Further studies on the triage process and its implications for safe, effective, and efficient
treatment are needed as a basis for national recommendations regarding use of designated nurses for triage
in emergency departments. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Nurses' Role in Triage in a Swedish Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163047-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Nurses' Role in Triage in a Swedish Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Goransson, Katarina, RN, BSc, MMSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Orebro University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD-student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Caring Sciences, Orebro, 70182, Sweden</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">katarina.goransson@ivo.oru.se</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Anna Ehrenberg, Margareta Ehnfors<br/><br/></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The triage nurses' roles, responsibilities, and autonomy vary throughout the world. The overall<br/>aim of the study was to describe how triage-related tasks were organized and performed in Swedish emergency<br/>departments. The specific issues addressed in this abstract are the nurses' roles, responsibilities and<br/>autonomy during triage.<br/>Design: A descriptive survey design to identify how emergency department triage was organized and performed<br/>in Swedish hospitals was used.<br/>Setting: Swedish emergency departments representative of geographic location and type of hospital.<br/>Sample: All emergency department managers in Sweden (n = 79) were invited to participate in the study.<br/>Sixty-nine nurse managers (87%) agreed to complete telephone interviews with the investigator. Approval<br/>from Orebro University ethics committee was obtained.<br/>Methodology: A structured interview guide, developed for the study, consisted of thirty-six items that covered<br/>four areas: demographic data, personnel working in the emergency department, knowledge of legislation<br/>about triage, and use of decision support and acuity rating scales. The content validity of the instrument<br/>was confirmed by earlier triage studies.<br/>Results: The greatest chance of being initially addressed by a nurse in the emergency department was during<br/>evening shifts for both ambulance-arriving (52/68) and non-ambulance-arriving (24/68) patients.<br/>Regardless of time of day and patients' way of presenting, nurses in all (69) emergency departments were<br/>responsible for assessing patients' chief complaints and deciding to order EKGs. However, other kinds of<br/>examinations and responsibility for further assessment varied. Complete 24-hour coverage of designated<br/>triage nurses was provided by five emergency departments for ambulance-arriving patients and by fourteen<br/>emergency departments for non-ambulance-arriving patients. Twenty-four (35%) emergency departments<br/>entrusted the designated triage nurses to refer health care-seeking patients to another caregiver;<br/>however, denying patients' access to the emergency department was not allowed in 19 emergency departments.<br/>Conclusions: The low use of designated triage nurses in Swedish emergency departments 24 hours per<br/>day shows a potential weakness in health care access. Swedish health care-seeking behaviors are similar to<br/>other developed countries and waiting times in emergency departments are tending to grow longer, indicating<br/>the increased need for well-trained designated triage nurses. Research findings indicate that nurses'<br/>autonomy in the triage process varies considerably among Swedish emergency departments and that nurses<br/>make triage decisions based on varying kinds of data. Importantly, some of these decisions may impact<br/>patient safety. Further studies on the triage process and its implications for safe, effective, and efficient<br/>treatment are needed as a basis for national recommendations regarding use of designated nurses for triage<br/>in emergency departments. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:38:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:38:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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