2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163053
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Injuries from Shopping Carts and Strollers in the Pediatric Population
Abstract:
Injuries from Shopping Carts and Strollers in the Pediatric Population
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2004
Author:Marcotte, Anne, RN, MSN, MICN
P.I. Institution Name:County of San Diego, Emergency Medical Services
Title:Quality Assurance Specialist
Contact Address:6255 Mission Gorge Road, San Diego, CA, 92120, USA
Contact Telephone:(619) 285-6429
Purpose: On average, nationally 24,000 children a year are treated in emergency departments for shopping
cart injuries, with over 650 children a year requiring hospital admission. Nationally, an estimated
13,000 visited emergency departments because of stroller-related injuries. This study evaluated the incidents
and outcomes of children in the community evaluated by paramedics for shopping cart or stroller-related
injuries.
Design/Sample/Setting: This study was a retrospective review of prehospital patient records for all
patients under 14 years old who were injured in shopping cart and stroller-related incidents and were
responded to by paramedics from July 1997 - December 2000. The study occurred in a large metropolitan
area.
Methodology: Prehospital patient records were identified for all patients under 14 years old. These
records were searched for all patients who were injured in an incident involving a shopping cart or
stroller. Descriptive analyses were performed on patient demographics, injury type, injury severity, and
patient disposition.
Results: During the study period, 241 cases were identified consisting of 120 shopping cart-related and
121 stroller-related injuries. The most frequent age for stroller injuries was birth to 6 months and for shopping
cart injuries was one year. Falls were the most common mechanism of injury, 70.3% for shopping
carts and 47.5% for strollers. Head injuries accounted for 53% and 59% of the primary injuries from shopping
cart and stroller incidents, respectively. An additional 12% and 18% suffered primary facial injuries.
Although the paramedics recommended transport to the emergency department for evaluation in all cases,
19% of the parents declined transport. Paramedics transported 77% of patients to an emergency department
for evaluation. Of the transported patients, 8.2% were admitted to the hospital. There were no deaths.
Conclusions: Shopping cart and stroller-related injuries are a common mechanism of injury among children.
Most of injuries are easily preventable with use of a seat belt. Over one-half of the patients in this
study suffered head injuries. Researchers have shown that unrecognized and mild head injuries in young
children can lead to cognitive and behavioral dysfunction. Given the number of parents who declined
transport for their child to the emergency department this is an injury area that requires parent and caregiver
education and concerted prevention efforts. Given that children visit emergency departments at an
estimated annual rate of 36.4/100, emergency nurses have the opportunity during visits for other causes to
provide education to parents on stroller and shopping cart injury prevention and the long-term effects of
unrecognized and untreated mild head injury. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInjuries from Shopping Carts and Strollers in the Pediatric Populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163053-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Injuries from Shopping Carts and Strollers in the Pediatric Population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Marcotte, Anne, RN, MSN, MICN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">County of San Diego, Emergency Medical Services</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Quality Assurance Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">6255 Mission Gorge Road, San Diego, CA, 92120, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(619) 285-6429</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">anne.marcotte@sdcounty.ca.gov</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: On average, nationally 24,000 children a year are treated in emergency departments for shopping<br/>cart injuries, with over 650 children a year requiring hospital admission. Nationally, an estimated<br/>13,000 visited emergency departments because of stroller-related injuries. This study evaluated the incidents<br/>and outcomes of children in the community evaluated by paramedics for shopping cart or stroller-related<br/>injuries.<br/>Design/Sample/Setting: This study was a retrospective review of prehospital patient records for all<br/>patients under 14 years old who were injured in shopping cart and stroller-related incidents and were<br/>responded to by paramedics from July 1997 - December 2000. The study occurred in a large metropolitan<br/>area.<br/>Methodology: Prehospital patient records were identified for all patients under 14 years old. These<br/>records were searched for all patients who were injured in an incident involving a shopping cart or<br/>stroller. Descriptive analyses were performed on patient demographics, injury type, injury severity, and<br/>patient disposition.<br/>Results: During the study period, 241 cases were identified consisting of 120 shopping cart-related and<br/>121 stroller-related injuries. The most frequent age for stroller injuries was birth to 6 months and for shopping<br/>cart injuries was one year. Falls were the most common mechanism of injury, 70.3% for shopping<br/>carts and 47.5% for strollers. Head injuries accounted for 53% and 59% of the primary injuries from shopping<br/>cart and stroller incidents, respectively. An additional 12% and 18% suffered primary facial injuries.<br/>Although the paramedics recommended transport to the emergency department for evaluation in all cases,<br/>19% of the parents declined transport. Paramedics transported 77% of patients to an emergency department<br/>for evaluation. Of the transported patients, 8.2% were admitted to the hospital. There were no deaths.<br/>Conclusions: Shopping cart and stroller-related injuries are a common mechanism of injury among children.<br/>Most of injuries are easily preventable with use of a seat belt. Over one-half of the patients in this<br/>study suffered head injuries. Researchers have shown that unrecognized and mild head injuries in young<br/>children can lead to cognitive and behavioral dysfunction. Given the number of parents who declined<br/>transport for their child to the emergency department this is an injury area that requires parent and caregiver<br/>education and concerted prevention efforts. Given that children visit emergency departments at an<br/>estimated annual rate of 36.4/100, emergency nurses have the opportunity during visits for other causes to<br/>provide education to parents on stroller and shopping cart injury prevention and the long-term effects of<br/>unrecognized and untreated mild head injury. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:38:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:38:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.