2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163059
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of a New Booster Seat Law
Abstract:
Impact of a New Booster Seat Law
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2004
Author:Murrin, Patricia A., RN, MPH
P.I. Institution Name:County of San Diego, Division of EMS
Title:Emergency Medical Services Coordinator
Contact Address:6255 Mission Gorge Road, San Diego, CA, 92120, USA
Contact Telephone:(619) 285-6429
Purpose: In 2000, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) estimated infant and toddler
safety seat use at 91%, up 31% from 1996, due in part to child safety seat legislation. However, with no
booster seat law in place for children who were too small or too young for adult vehicle safety belts, booster
seat use was estimated at 10%. Local data showed that prior to January 2002, boosters comprised 5.6%
(59/1046) of seats inspected. Child safety seat legislation has historically been more effective than public
education efforts alone in changing occupant safety behaviors. California extended the child restraint law
to provide protection for children up to age 6 or 60 lbs in January 2002.The purpose of this study was to
compare pre- and post-law use of booster seats as evidenced by data gathered during child restraint
inspections, including booster use; misuse/error by booster type; age and weight of child; sibling seats
inspected; and vehicle type.
Design/Setting: Cross-sectional study performed on data from 50 child restraint inspection events held
throughout a large metropolitan county in California during 1999 - 2002.
Sample: The sample consisted of booster child safety seat inspection forms from 50 community-based
child safety seat inspection events sponsored by SDSafe Kids.
Methodology: Child safety seat inspection events consist of a comprehensive inspection of each child
restraint for proper installation and adjustment. A standard collection form was used to record errors
encountered and recommendations made to parents/caregivers regarding appropriate type of restraint and
proper restraint installation and adjustment. Descriptive analysis was performed on data collected on
errors and recommendations both pre- and post-booster legislation in California. Time periods were compared
on booster seat use, misuse/error by booster type, age, weight, sibling seats inspected, and vehicle
type. Geographic analysis examined spatial implications of inspection location, participants' travel distance,
and socioeconomic status.
Results: Prior to January 2002, booster seats comprised 5.6% of seats inspected, and 37% of these demonstrated
at least one error. Eighty percent of shield and 28% of belt-positioning boosters had at least one
misuse. Seventy-five percent of children for whom boosters were inspected also had a sibling's seat
inspected. Preliminary data collected after January 2002 showed booster seat inspections increased to
11%. No shield booster seats were inspected.
Conclusions: Preliminary results demonstrated an increase in the number of booster seats inspected at
community-based child safety seat inspection events following the implementation of a law requiring child
safety seats for children up to age 6 or 60 lbs. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of a New Booster Seat Lawen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163059-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of a New Booster Seat Law</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Murrin, Patricia A., RN, MPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">County of San Diego, Division of EMS</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Emergency Medical Services Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">6255 Mission Gorge Road, San Diego, CA, 92120, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(619) 285-6429</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">patti.murrin@sdcounty.ca.gov</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: In 2000, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) estimated infant and toddler<br/>safety seat use at 91%, up 31% from 1996, due in part to child safety seat legislation. However, with no<br/>booster seat law in place for children who were too small or too young for adult vehicle safety belts, booster<br/>seat use was estimated at 10%. Local data showed that prior to January 2002, boosters comprised 5.6%<br/>(59/1046) of seats inspected. Child safety seat legislation has historically been more effective than public<br/>education efforts alone in changing occupant safety behaviors. California extended the child restraint law<br/>to provide protection for children up to age 6 or 60 lbs in January 2002.The purpose of this study was to<br/>compare pre- and post-law use of booster seats as evidenced by data gathered during child restraint<br/>inspections, including booster use; misuse/error by booster type; age and weight of child; sibling seats<br/>inspected; and vehicle type.<br/>Design/Setting: Cross-sectional study performed on data from 50 child restraint inspection events held<br/>throughout a large metropolitan county in California during 1999 - 2002.<br/>Sample: The sample consisted of booster child safety seat inspection forms from 50 community-based<br/>child safety seat inspection events sponsored by SDSafe Kids.<br/>Methodology: Child safety seat inspection events consist of a comprehensive inspection of each child<br/>restraint for proper installation and adjustment. A standard collection form was used to record errors<br/>encountered and recommendations made to parents/caregivers regarding appropriate type of restraint and<br/>proper restraint installation and adjustment. Descriptive analysis was performed on data collected on<br/>errors and recommendations both pre- and post-booster legislation in California. Time periods were compared<br/>on booster seat use, misuse/error by booster type, age, weight, sibling seats inspected, and vehicle<br/>type. Geographic analysis examined spatial implications of inspection location, participants' travel distance,<br/>and socioeconomic status.<br/>Results: Prior to January 2002, booster seats comprised 5.6% of seats inspected, and 37% of these demonstrated<br/>at least one error. Eighty percent of shield and 28% of belt-positioning boosters had at least one<br/>misuse. Seventy-five percent of children for whom boosters were inspected also had a sibling's seat<br/>inspected. Preliminary data collected after January 2002 showed booster seat inspections increased to<br/>11%. No shield booster seats were inspected.<br/>Conclusions: Preliminary results demonstrated an increase in the number of booster seats inspected at<br/>community-based child safety seat inspection events following the implementation of a law requiring child<br/>safety seats for children up to age 6 or 60 lbs. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:38:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:38:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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