2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163070
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring Past Experiences: The Foundation of Emergency Nursing 1940-1970
Abstract:
Exploring Past Experiences: The Foundation of Emergency Nursing 1940-1970
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2004
Author:Annan, Sandra L., RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of VA Emergency Department & School of Nursing
Title:RN/ Forensic Nurse Examiner
Contact Address:P.O. Box 801458, Charlottesville, VA, 22908, USA
Contact Telephone:(434) 531-5699
Purpose: An exploration of the history of emergency care provides clinicians and researchers with insight
toward solutions to today's emergency department problems. Although currently emergency departments
are one of the hospital's busiest services, providing both primary and emergent medical care, the historical
development of emergency care and emergency nursing in the post-World War II period has not been
examined. This study investigated the factors that led to full-fledged emergency departments, to the appearance
of emergency nursing as a clinical specialty, and to the development of the Emergency Nurses
Association.
Design: This study is a descriptive, social, and historical analysis of the origins and development of emergency
nursing into clinical specialties.
Setting: Interviews occurred at the participant's home, via telephone, or at a set meeting location on the
campus of University of Virginia.
Sample: A purposeful convenience sample was recruited which included retired emergency nurses and
one retired health insurance executive. IRB approval at the University of Virginia ensured protection of
subject's rights.
Methodology: A variety of primary sources used included personal interviews, along with professional
journals, medical and nursing textbooks, archival papers, and lay publications of the period. Secondary
sources included nursing, medical, and hospital histories.
Results: From 1940 to 1955, patient utilization of emergency rooms increased 400%, creating an important
new source of revenue for hospitals. Growth in knowledge, experience, and technology, along with
increased funding, produced an escalation of consumer expectations, which led to substantive changes in
emergency rooms and the health professionals who staffed them. Moreover, "accident care" developed
from an unstructured, ill-defined afterthought of hospital services to a well-organized specialty generating
significant hospital business with a high public profile.
Conclusions: During the last fifty years, the public's view of the emergency room as a mere entry point
into the hospital or a place to die was replaced with an expectation of sophisticated and life-saving emergency
care. Nurses developed clinical skills to manage this challenging population and, with the cooperation
of on-call physicians, were the principle health care providers during this time. An understanding of
how past decisions laid a foundation can contribute towards resolving problems today. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring Past Experiences: The Foundation of Emergency Nursing 1940-1970en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163070-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exploring Past Experiences: The Foundation of Emergency Nursing 1940-1970</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Annan, Sandra L., RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of VA Emergency Department &amp; School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">RN/ Forensic Nurse Examiner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">P.O. Box 801458, Charlottesville, VA, 22908, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(434) 531-5699</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sla9a@virginia.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: An exploration of the history of emergency care provides clinicians and researchers with insight<br/>toward solutions to today's emergency department problems. Although currently emergency departments<br/>are one of the hospital's busiest services, providing both primary and emergent medical care, the historical<br/>development of emergency care and emergency nursing in the post-World War II period has not been<br/>examined. This study investigated the factors that led to full-fledged emergency departments, to the appearance<br/>of emergency nursing as a clinical specialty, and to the development of the Emergency Nurses<br/>Association.<br/>Design: This study is a descriptive, social, and historical analysis of the origins and development of emergency<br/>nursing into clinical specialties.<br/>Setting: Interviews occurred at the participant's home, via telephone, or at a set meeting location on the<br/>campus of University of Virginia.<br/>Sample: A purposeful convenience sample was recruited which included retired emergency nurses and<br/>one retired health insurance executive. IRB approval at the University of Virginia ensured protection of<br/>subject's rights.<br/>Methodology: A variety of primary sources used included personal interviews, along with professional<br/>journals, medical and nursing textbooks, archival papers, and lay publications of the period. Secondary<br/>sources included nursing, medical, and hospital histories.<br/>Results: From 1940 to 1955, patient utilization of emergency rooms increased 400%, creating an important<br/>new source of revenue for hospitals. Growth in knowledge, experience, and technology, along with<br/>increased funding, produced an escalation of consumer expectations, which led to substantive changes in<br/>emergency rooms and the health professionals who staffed them. Moreover, &quot;accident care&quot; developed<br/>from an unstructured, ill-defined afterthought of hospital services to a well-organized specialty generating<br/>significant hospital business with a high public profile.<br/>Conclusions: During the last fifty years, the public's view of the emergency room as a mere entry point<br/>into the hospital or a place to die was replaced with an expectation of sophisticated and life-saving emergency<br/>care. Nurses developed clinical skills to manage this challenging population and, with the cooperation<br/>of on-call physicians, were the principle health care providers during this time. An understanding of<br/>how past decisions laid a foundation can contribute towards resolving problems today. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:39:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:39:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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