Rectal Temperature Changes of Wistar Rats with Second-Degree Scald Burns in Hot and Humid Environment Following Immediate Cooling Therapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163080
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rectal Temperature Changes of Wistar Rats with Second-Degree Scald Burns in Hot and Humid Environment Following Immediate Cooling Therapy
Abstract:
Rectal Temperature Changes of Wistar Rats with Second-Degree Scald Burns in Hot and Humid Environment Following Immediate Cooling Therapy
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2004
Author:Li, Ya Jie, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Nanfang Hospital, Department of Nursing
Title:Director of Nursing Department
Contact Address:The First Military Medical University, Guangzhou, China, 510515, China
Purpose: Burn care is an often-encountered issue in the emergency department setting. New methods of
more efficient treatment are currently being conducted. Ethically, no researcher could induce burns on
humans to test burn therapies while controlling for different factors; however, important knowledge is to
be gained from such studies. Therefore, this study chose to use an animal model to test a wound dressing
with a cooling therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the dressing material used
for cooling by observing changes in body temperature after immediate cooling therapy on Wistar rats with
superficial second-degree scald burns in a hot and humid environment. Using this method, the researcher
could control the type of burn, length of exposure to burn source, and the subsequent treatment (or nontreatment).
Design/Setting/Sample: This prospective study was conducted in simulated climate cabin laboratory
using male Wistar rats (285 +/- 310g). This species was identified by literature review as an established
burn model. The simulative climate cabin laboratory modulates temperature, humidity, and wind speed
(designed and built by this institution). Data was analyzed using repeated ANOVA measures. Approval
(#D2001B0230) for animal use was granted by this institution's animal care and use committee.
Methodology: Twenty-four (24) Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 6): Normal temperature
control (NTC), normal temperature cooling therapy (NTCT), hot and humid control (HHC), and hot
and humid cooling therapy (HHCT). Superficial second-degree scald (abdominal) burns were induced in all
rats. This was followed with the cooling therapy in the NTCT and HHCT groups at a dry bulb temperature
(Tdb) of 35.33 ¦ 0.35 degrees C with a relative humidity of 70.81% ¦ 1.38%. The two control groups were treated
at a Tdb of 26.33 ¦ 1.29 degrees C with a relative humidity of 71.05% ¦ 4.57% (without cooling therapy). Cooling
therapy (wound dressing) was placed on the burn surface. The exposure time of each group was 120 minutes
with the rat's body temperature (Tr) recorded every 20 minutes (rectal temperature). To minimize
pain, rats were anaesthetized by 3% amyl barbital (30 mg/kg body weight) celiac injection and had ample
access to food and water before, during, and after testing.
Results: Comparisons between the measurements taken at seven different time points, showed that the
body temperature (Tr) of the rats (post-burn) was elevated in HHC (p < 0.001) and decreased when cooling
therapy was applied (HHCT) (p < 0.001). Interactions between the environmental temperature and
cooling therapy were noted in their influence on Tr (p = 0.003). As the exposure time to temperature and
humidity were prolonged, Tr slowly decreased in the NTC group, mildly fluctuated in the NTCT group, but
elevated in HHC and HHCT groups with gradual increase of the differences between the measurements
taken at the same time points.
Conclusions: Emergency department nurses are faced with and must be prepared to deal with all types
of illnesses and injuries. While clinical trials are a major part of the work being done to improve and develop
medications, procedures, and products, research studies using animal models are their precursors as the
important first step towards this goal. This study has shown that application of this burn dressing material
(containing a cooling therapy) on the burn surface can efficiently lower overall body temperature in rats,
which may prevent the progression of the heat injury. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRectal Temperature Changes of Wistar Rats with Second-Degree Scald Burns in Hot and Humid Environment Following Immediate Cooling Therapyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163080-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Rectal Temperature Changes of Wistar Rats with Second-Degree Scald Burns in Hot and Humid Environment Following Immediate Cooling Therapy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Li, Ya Jie, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Nanfang Hospital, Department of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Nursing Department</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">The First Military Medical University, Guangzhou, China, 510515, China</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">catheline_2002hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Burn care is an often-encountered issue in the emergency department setting. New methods of<br/>more efficient treatment are currently being conducted. Ethically, no researcher could induce burns on<br/>humans to test burn therapies while controlling for different factors; however, important knowledge is to<br/>be gained from such studies. Therefore, this study chose to use an animal model to test a wound dressing<br/>with a cooling therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the dressing material used<br/>for cooling by observing changes in body temperature after immediate cooling therapy on Wistar rats with<br/>superficial second-degree scald burns in a hot and humid environment. Using this method, the researcher<br/>could control the type of burn, length of exposure to burn source, and the subsequent treatment (or nontreatment).<br/>Design/Setting/Sample: This prospective study was conducted in simulated climate cabin laboratory<br/>using male Wistar rats (285 +/- 310g). This species was identified by literature review as an established<br/>burn model. The simulative climate cabin laboratory modulates temperature, humidity, and wind speed<br/>(designed and built by this institution). Data was analyzed using repeated ANOVA measures. Approval<br/>(#D2001B0230) for animal use was granted by this institution's animal care and use committee.<br/>Methodology: Twenty-four (24) Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 6): Normal temperature<br/>control (NTC), normal temperature cooling therapy (NTCT), hot and humid control (HHC), and hot<br/>and humid cooling therapy (HHCT). Superficial second-degree scald (abdominal) burns were induced in all<br/>rats. This was followed with the cooling therapy in the NTCT and HHCT groups at a dry bulb temperature<br/>(Tdb) of 35.33 &brvbar; 0.35 degrees C with a relative humidity of 70.81% &brvbar; 1.38%. The two control groups were treated<br/>at a Tdb of 26.33 &brvbar; 1.29 degrees C with a relative humidity of 71.05% &brvbar; 4.57% (without cooling therapy). Cooling<br/>therapy (wound dressing) was placed on the burn surface. The exposure time of each group was 120 minutes<br/>with the rat's body temperature (Tr) recorded every 20 minutes (rectal temperature). To minimize<br/>pain, rats were anaesthetized by 3% amyl barbital (30 mg/kg body weight) celiac injection and had ample<br/>access to food and water before, during, and after testing.<br/>Results: Comparisons between the measurements taken at seven different time points, showed that the<br/>body temperature (Tr) of the rats (post-burn) was elevated in HHC (p &lt; 0.001) and decreased when cooling<br/>therapy was applied (HHCT) (p &lt; 0.001). Interactions between the environmental temperature and<br/>cooling therapy were noted in their influence on Tr (p = 0.003). As the exposure time to temperature and<br/>humidity were prolonged, Tr slowly decreased in the NTC group, mildly fluctuated in the NTCT group, but<br/>elevated in HHC and HHCT groups with gradual increase of the differences between the measurements<br/>taken at the same time points.<br/>Conclusions: Emergency department nurses are faced with and must be prepared to deal with all types<br/>of illnesses and injuries. While clinical trials are a major part of the work being done to improve and develop<br/>medications, procedures, and products, research studies using animal models are their precursors as the<br/>important first step towards this goal. This study has shown that application of this burn dressing material<br/>(containing a cooling therapy) on the burn surface can efficiently lower overall body temperature in rats,<br/>which may prevent the progression of the heat injury. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:39:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:39:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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