Learned from Natural Disasters- Post Tsunami and Post Pakistan Earthquake. A Realistic View from the Trenches. Results of a Research Study Done in Banda Aceh, Indonesia Post Tsunami.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163094
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Learned from Natural Disasters- Post Tsunami and Post Pakistan Earthquake. A Realistic View from the Trenches. Results of a Research Study Done in Banda Aceh, Indonesia Post Tsunami.
Author(s):
Redwood-Campbell, Lynda
Author Details:
Lynda Redwood-Campbell, MD, CCFP, DTM & H (UK), MPH (International Health), Associate Professor, Undergraduate Medicine Co-ordinator, Department of Family Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: redwood@mcmaster.ca
Abstract:
Introduction: On December 26, 2004, an earthquake in Asia set off the largest Tsunami waves in recorded history. Hundreds of thousands of people were killed and many more displaced and injured; the ICRC Red Cross opened a field hospital in Banda Aceh on January 16, 2005. This study describes the types of illnesses seen in the out-patient/casualty department (OPD/CD) of the ICRC hospital 9 weeks after the Tsunami. It describes the percentage of people seen for problems directly related to the Tsunami and also includes a basic screen for depression and PTSD symptoms. Methods: A prospective 5-day study was done from March 1-5, 2005. Patients registering in the ICRC field hospital in Banda Aceh were considered for the study. Data collected included; age, gender, diagnosis in the OPD/CD and whether or not this problem was directly related to the Tsunami. Seven basic screening questions for possible depression, PTSD were asked. Results: 12% of the problems seen in the OPD/CD 9 weeks after the Tsunami were still directly related to the Tsunami. Indirect causes are difficult to measure. Sixty three percent of patients in the study were male. The majority of problems seen included; urological (19%), digestive (16%), respiratory (12%), musculoskeletal (12%). Twenty four percent of patients had 4+ (of 7) symptoms of possible depression/PTSD, although less than 2% were actually diagnosed with a mental health problem. Only 6% of the patients were children and less than 30% women. Discussion/Conclusion: Woman and children were not seen as frequently post Tsunami. This will be discussed. Post earthquake/tsunami health problems and medical needs are different than the needs of those affected in conflict zones. Many problems were chronic medical problems and may be indicative of the lack of health care access before the Tsunami.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLearned from Natural Disasters- Post Tsunami and Post Pakistan Earthquake. A Realistic View from the Trenches. Results of a Research Study Done in Banda Aceh, Indonesia Post Tsunami.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRedwood-Campbell, Lyndaen_US
dc.author.detailsLynda Redwood-Campbell, MD, CCFP, DTM & H (UK), MPH (International Health), Associate Professor, Undergraduate Medicine Co-ordinator, Department of Family Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: redwood@mcmaster.caen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163094-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: On December 26, 2004, an earthquake in Asia set off the largest Tsunami waves in recorded history. Hundreds of thousands of people were killed and many more displaced and injured; the ICRC Red Cross opened a field hospital in Banda Aceh on January 16, 2005. This study describes the types of illnesses seen in the out-patient/casualty department (OPD/CD) of the ICRC hospital 9 weeks after the Tsunami. It describes the percentage of people seen for problems directly related to the Tsunami and also includes a basic screen for depression and PTSD symptoms. Methods: A prospective 5-day study was done from March 1-5, 2005. Patients registering in the ICRC field hospital in Banda Aceh were considered for the study. Data collected included; age, gender, diagnosis in the OPD/CD and whether or not this problem was directly related to the Tsunami. Seven basic screening questions for possible depression, PTSD were asked. Results: 12% of the problems seen in the OPD/CD 9 weeks after the Tsunami were still directly related to the Tsunami. Indirect causes are difficult to measure. Sixty three percent of patients in the study were male. The majority of problems seen included; urological (19%), digestive (16%), respiratory (12%), musculoskeletal (12%). Twenty four percent of patients had 4+ (of 7) symptoms of possible depression/PTSD, although less than 2% were actually diagnosed with a mental health problem. Only 6% of the patients were children and less than 30% women. Discussion/Conclusion: Woman and children were not seen as frequently post Tsunami. This will be discussed. Post earthquake/tsunami health problems and medical needs are different than the needs of those affected in conflict zones. Many problems were chronic medical problems and may be indicative of the lack of health care access before the Tsunami.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:33:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:33:39Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.