2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163096
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fathers' Role in Empowering Breastfeeding
Author(s):
Rempel, Lynn A.; Rempel, John K.
Author Details:
Lynn A. Rempel, BScN, MA Sc, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada, email: lrempel@brocku.ca; John K. Rempel
Abstract:
Given the many benefits of breastfeeding for children and mothers, the World Health Organization and health professionals globally are interested in empowering all mothers to breastfeed successfully. Although breastfeeding decisions are typically seen to rest with mothers, our previous research indicated that fathers could have a powerful influence on mothers' breastfeeding decisions. Fathers' pre-birth breastfeeding beliefs predicted mothers' prenatal and postpartum breastfeeding intentions. Surprisingly, mothers whose partners approved of longer duration breastfeeding tended to breastfeed even longer than they initially intended. This current qualitative study was conducted to more fully understand the mechanisms by which fathers influence mothers' breastfeeding decisions. We interviewed 21 breastfeeding couples, asking them to describe how fathers might influence their partners to continue or discontinue breastfeeding. Each author interviewed the same-sex member of the couple in the couple's home. Based on the couples' responses, we identified 38 breastfeeding facilitating and 20 potentially undermining behaviours. Couples indicated that fathers had facilitated breastfeeding by engaging in knowledgeable discussion, verbal encouragement, direct assistance with breastfeeding problems, pampering and responding sensitively to the mother's needs, assisting with child care, and valuing the mothers' decisions. Behaviours undermining breastfeeding included rational persuasion, direct discouragement, indirect discouragement (e.g. derogatory breastfeeding jokes), limited instrumental help, and pressure to personally feed the infant. These results highlight how important fathers are in empowering mothers to continue breastfeeding, both when mothers experience early breastfeeding problems and through ongoing helpful affirmation. Our results emphasize the importance of involving and educating fathers about breastfeeding and their role in facilitating breastfeeding. Research from Brazil and Cameroon supports the global relevance of fathers' influence on women's breastfeeding decisions. Mullany, Hindin, & Becker (2005) suggest that empowering women's health decisions is enhanced by the involvement of male partners. Further research is needed to determine how to effectively involve fathers in empowering women to successfully engage in activities, such as breastfeeding, that will promote their health and that of their children.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFathers' Role in Empowering Breastfeedingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRempel, Lynn A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRempel, John K.en_US
dc.author.detailsLynn A. Rempel, BScN, MA Sc, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada, email: lrempel@brocku.ca; John K. Rempelen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163096-
dc.description.abstractGiven the many benefits of breastfeeding for children and mothers, the World Health Organization and health professionals globally are interested in empowering all mothers to breastfeed successfully. Although breastfeeding decisions are typically seen to rest with mothers, our previous research indicated that fathers could have a powerful influence on mothers' breastfeeding decisions. Fathers' pre-birth breastfeeding beliefs predicted mothers' prenatal and postpartum breastfeeding intentions. Surprisingly, mothers whose partners approved of longer duration breastfeeding tended to breastfeed even longer than they initially intended. This current qualitative study was conducted to more fully understand the mechanisms by which fathers influence mothers' breastfeeding decisions. We interviewed 21 breastfeeding couples, asking them to describe how fathers might influence their partners to continue or discontinue breastfeeding. Each author interviewed the same-sex member of the couple in the couple's home. Based on the couples' responses, we identified 38 breastfeeding facilitating and 20 potentially undermining behaviours. Couples indicated that fathers had facilitated breastfeeding by engaging in knowledgeable discussion, verbal encouragement, direct assistance with breastfeeding problems, pampering and responding sensitively to the mother's needs, assisting with child care, and valuing the mothers' decisions. Behaviours undermining breastfeeding included rational persuasion, direct discouragement, indirect discouragement (e.g. derogatory breastfeeding jokes), limited instrumental help, and pressure to personally feed the infant. These results highlight how important fathers are in empowering mothers to continue breastfeeding, both when mothers experience early breastfeeding problems and through ongoing helpful affirmation. Our results emphasize the importance of involving and educating fathers about breastfeeding and their role in facilitating breastfeeding. Research from Brazil and Cameroon supports the global relevance of fathers' influence on women's breastfeeding decisions. Mullany, Hindin, & Becker (2005) suggest that empowering women's health decisions is enhanced by the involvement of male partners. Further research is needed to determine how to effectively involve fathers in empowering women to successfully engage in activities, such as breastfeeding, that will promote their health and that of their children.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:33:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:33:42Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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