Childhood Lead Poisoning Control: How We Can Learn from the Experiences of the United States

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163107
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Childhood Lead Poisoning Control: How We Can Learn from the Experiences of the United States
Author(s):
Shen, Lei
Author Details:
Lei Shen, MHA Candidate, HCEP, Research Assistant/Student, Institute of Health Promotion Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, email: shenl76@yahoo.com
Abstract:
Purpose: To find out the lead poisoning control policies in the US relevant to children's health and identify successful and unsuccessful practical experiences in implementation of government instruments, from which other countries who are addressing or looking for methods to resolve the problem can learn. Background: Children are particularly vulnerable to environmental threats because of their specific biological factors and behaviours. Lead poisoning is one of the most serious environmental problems affecting children's health globally. Though children's exposure to lead has reduced greatly in the past three decades due to regulations on some consumer products with lead, childhood lead poisoning is still a major burden of disease in the world. The US is the first country that banned the use of lead and has environmental policies that directly address children's health. However, lead exposure continues to threaten large numbers of children. It is estimated that costs of $43.4 billion can be attributed childhood lead poisoning annually in the US. Design: The MEME model is applied as a framework for this study. By literature review, the paper describes the four ingredients of the MEME model, which required for the monitoring of children's environmental health: contextual indicators, exposure indicators, health outcome indicators, and action indicators. Throughout these exercises, efforts are made to identify the areas where governments can take action on childhood lead poisoning. Results: The dramatic decrease in the severity of childhood lead poisoning in the US during the past three decades is thanks to the governance instruments that restrict the use of lead based paint, the removal of lead from gasoline. However, the burden of childhood lead poisoning is still on the top five preventable diseases in the US and the cost is high in terms of the long-term effects. Conclusion: The gap between the achievement and the burden of disease makes us rethink childhood lead poisoning assessment and management strategies. Finally, the study recommends six strategies on risk identification, assessment, management and implementation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChildhood Lead Poisoning Control: How We Can Learn from the Experiences of the United Statesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorShen, Leien_US
dc.author.detailsLei Shen, MHA Candidate, HCEP, Research Assistant/Student, Institute of Health Promotion Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, email: shenl76@yahoo.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163107-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To find out the lead poisoning control policies in the US relevant to children's health and identify successful and unsuccessful practical experiences in implementation of government instruments, from which other countries who are addressing or looking for methods to resolve the problem can learn. Background: Children are particularly vulnerable to environmental threats because of their specific biological factors and behaviours. Lead poisoning is one of the most serious environmental problems affecting children's health globally. Though children's exposure to lead has reduced greatly in the past three decades due to regulations on some consumer products with lead, childhood lead poisoning is still a major burden of disease in the world. The US is the first country that banned the use of lead and has environmental policies that directly address children's health. However, lead exposure continues to threaten large numbers of children. It is estimated that costs of $43.4 billion can be attributed childhood lead poisoning annually in the US. Design: The MEME model is applied as a framework for this study. By literature review, the paper describes the four ingredients of the MEME model, which required for the monitoring of children's environmental health: contextual indicators, exposure indicators, health outcome indicators, and action indicators. Throughout these exercises, efforts are made to identify the areas where governments can take action on childhood lead poisoning. Results: The dramatic decrease in the severity of childhood lead poisoning in the US during the past three decades is thanks to the governance instruments that restrict the use of lead based paint, the removal of lead from gasoline. However, the burden of childhood lead poisoning is still on the top five preventable diseases in the US and the cost is high in terms of the long-term effects. Conclusion: The gap between the achievement and the burden of disease makes us rethink childhood lead poisoning assessment and management strategies. Finally, the study recommends six strategies on risk identification, assessment, management and implementation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:33:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:33:56Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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