Missed clinic appointments and altered cognitive function associated with persons with HIV and liver disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163110
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Missed clinic appointments and altered cognitive function associated with persons with HIV and liver disease
Author(s):
Henderson, Wendy A.; Erlen, Judith A.; Kim, Kevin H.
Author Details:
Wendy A. Henderson, MSN, CRNP, Duquesne University/PhD Student University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: wendyh@duq.edu; Judith A. Erlen, PhD, RN, FAAN; Kevin H. Kim, PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: This study examined characteristic differences between persons with HIV with and without liver disease by assessing the relationships of liver disease to biologic/physiologic factors, symptom status, functional status, and selected socio-demographic characteristics. Theoretical Framework: Wilson and Cleary's model of health related quality of life guided this study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Measures included: biological/physiologic factors (documented liver disease/HIV viral load/CD 4 count), symptom status (Beck Depression Inventory II [BDI-II], Medical Outcomes Survey [MOS-HIV] cognitive subscale), and functional status (missed clinical appointments, MOS-HIV physical subscale). This cross-sectional analysis used baseline data from the parent study (RO1NR04749). Analysis included descriptive statistics, correlations, Chi-square, independent sample t-tests, and path analysis. Results: The sample included 215 participants, 44.7% (N=96) with HIV and liver disease, 68% male, and 62% Caucasian. The average age was 40.63 +7.60 years. There was a significant prediction of functional status (missed appointments) by presence of liver disease, 2(1) =5.598, p=.018, exp (B) =1.998, suggesting individuals with documented liver disease were approximately 2 times more likely to miss clinical appointments. Documented liver disease was related to altered cognitive function, z=-2.987, B=-.161, p=.017, and decreased physical function MOS-HIV, z=4.850, B=.364, p< .001. There was a significant indirect relationship of missed appointments and documented liver disease, and significant negative relationship of cognitive function and physical function. There were no significant differences between the groups with regard to age, race, or gender. Conclusions and Implications: There was no direct path from usual physiologic indicators (HIV viral load or CD-4 count) to symptom status as conceptualized in the model regardless of group. This supports the complexities associated with managing patients with HIV and liver disease. Future research is needed with a larger sample and potentially a different measure of physiologic liver function in order to better understand the multifaceted issues that affect individuals with HIV and documented liver disease.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMissed clinic appointments and altered cognitive function associated with persons with HIV and liver diseaseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHenderson, Wendy A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorErlen, Judith A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, Kevin H.en_US
dc.author.detailsWendy A. Henderson, MSN, CRNP, Duquesne University/PhD Student University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: wendyh@duq.edu; Judith A. Erlen, PhD, RN, FAAN; Kevin H. Kim, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163110-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study examined characteristic differences between persons with HIV with and without liver disease by assessing the relationships of liver disease to biologic/physiologic factors, symptom status, functional status, and selected socio-demographic characteristics. Theoretical Framework: Wilson and Cleary's model of health related quality of life guided this study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Measures included: biological/physiologic factors (documented liver disease/HIV viral load/CD 4 count), symptom status (Beck Depression Inventory II [BDI-II], Medical Outcomes Survey [MOS-HIV] cognitive subscale), and functional status (missed clinical appointments, MOS-HIV physical subscale). This cross-sectional analysis used baseline data from the parent study (RO1NR04749). Analysis included descriptive statistics, correlations, Chi-square, independent sample t-tests, and path analysis. Results: The sample included 215 participants, 44.7% (N=96) with HIV and liver disease, 68% male, and 62% Caucasian. The average age was 40.63 +7.60 years. There was a significant prediction of functional status (missed appointments) by presence of liver disease, 2(1) =5.598, p=.018, exp (B) =1.998, suggesting individuals with documented liver disease were approximately 2 times more likely to miss clinical appointments. Documented liver disease was related to altered cognitive function, z=-2.987, B=-.161, p=.017, and decreased physical function MOS-HIV, z=4.850, B=.364, p< .001. There was a significant indirect relationship of missed appointments and documented liver disease, and significant negative relationship of cognitive function and physical function. There were no significant differences between the groups with regard to age, race, or gender. Conclusions and Implications: There was no direct path from usual physiologic indicators (HIV viral load or CD-4 count) to symptom status as conceptualized in the model regardless of group. This supports the complexities associated with managing patients with HIV and liver disease. Future research is needed with a larger sample and potentially a different measure of physiologic liver function in order to better understand the multifaceted issues that affect individuals with HIV and documented liver disease.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:01:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:01:26Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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