2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163111
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Triage Time for Acute Ischemic Stroke in Oxfordshire England
Author(s):
Hinkle, Janice; Manoj, A.
Author Details:
Janice Hinkle, RN, PhD, CNRN, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom, email: janice.hinkle@ndm.ox.ac.uk; A. Manoj, MD, Acute Stroke Program
Abstract:
Purpose: In England, patients with acute illness present to the hospital via the Accident and Emergency (A&E) department or to a Medical Assessment Unit (MAU). The purpose of this study was to investigate if the nursing triage time and the time first seen by a doctor differed between patient arrivals in A&E and MAU. Theoretical Framework: Acute ischemic stroke therapy is time dependent. Prompt nursing triage is essential to treat patients and reduce long term disability. Similarly, to conserve resources, patients not likely to benefit from aggressive management need to be identified early. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This prospective audit of 332 patients with suspected stroke looked at nursing triage times in the John Radcliffe hospital NHS Trust. Analysis was conducted using SPSS version 12. Results: The mean age was 76 years and the majority of patients were female (54%). Prior to admission 33% of patients lived alone, 90% were living in their own home, and 17% already had a care-giver prior to admission. Approximately 65% of patients arrived at A&E while 33% first presented to the MAU. Irrespective of arrival place the majority of patients (89%) arrived to the hospital by ambulance. There was no significant difference in the mean nursing triage time of patients arriving at A&E (14 minutes) compared to patients arriving in MAU (19 minutes). There was a significant difference in the mean time from nursing triage to the patient being seen by a doctor if the patient arrived in A&E (49 minutes) compared to MAU (84 minutes) [t = -3.468, df = 77.567, p< .001]. Conclusions and Implications: These results are encouraging. Nursing, in at least one hospital in England, see suspected stroke as an emergency and triage the majority of patients very quickly. Further investigation into the reasons for the delay in physicians seeing acute stroke patients is warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Triage Time for Acute Ischemic Stroke in Oxfordshire Englanden_GB
dc.contributor.authorHinkle, Janiceen_US
dc.contributor.authorManoj, A.en_US
dc.author.detailsJanice Hinkle, RN, PhD, CNRN, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom, email: janice.hinkle@ndm.ox.ac.uk; A. Manoj, MD, Acute Stroke Programen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163111-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: In England, patients with acute illness present to the hospital via the Accident and Emergency (A&E) department or to a Medical Assessment Unit (MAU). The purpose of this study was to investigate if the nursing triage time and the time first seen by a doctor differed between patient arrivals in A&E and MAU. Theoretical Framework: Acute ischemic stroke therapy is time dependent. Prompt nursing triage is essential to treat patients and reduce long term disability. Similarly, to conserve resources, patients not likely to benefit from aggressive management need to be identified early. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This prospective audit of 332 patients with suspected stroke looked at nursing triage times in the John Radcliffe hospital NHS Trust. Analysis was conducted using SPSS version 12. Results: The mean age was 76 years and the majority of patients were female (54%). Prior to admission 33% of patients lived alone, 90% were living in their own home, and 17% already had a care-giver prior to admission. Approximately 65% of patients arrived at A&E while 33% first presented to the MAU. Irrespective of arrival place the majority of patients (89%) arrived to the hospital by ambulance. There was no significant difference in the mean nursing triage time of patients arriving at A&E (14 minutes) compared to patients arriving in MAU (19 minutes). There was a significant difference in the mean time from nursing triage to the patient being seen by a doctor if the patient arrived in A&E (49 minutes) compared to MAU (84 minutes) [t = -3.468, df = 77.567, p< .001]. Conclusions and Implications: These results are encouraging. Nursing, in at least one hospital in England, see suspected stroke as an emergency and triage the majority of patients very quickly. Further investigation into the reasons for the delay in physicians seeing acute stroke patients is warranted.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:01:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:01:27Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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