2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163112
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Timely Study: Outcomes of 72-hour and 96-hour Peripheral IV Restart Times
Author(s):
Hoerst, Barbara J.; Fox, Mary Agnes; Hardy, Jean
Author Details:
Barbara J. Hoerst, PhD, RN, La Salle University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: hoerst@lasalle.edu; Mary Agnes Fox, MSN, RN; Jean Hardy, BSN, RN, St. Mary Medical Center
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of the Time of Restart Study is to compare the outcomes of a peripheral intravenous catheter (IVC) restart time of 72 hours with a restart time of 96 hours. Theoretical Framework: The IOWA Model of Evidence-based Practice to Promote Quality Care guides this study. Existing SMMC policy requires peripheral IV catheters to be restarted at 72 hours. The Infusion Nurses' Society (INS, 2006) has identified this as the recommended duration to prevent complications associated with use of peripheral IV catheters (e.g., phlebitis, infiltration). The CDC (2002) identifies 72 to 96 hours as the recommended time frame for changing peripheral IV sites. This study seeks evidence to assist nurses in making an informed decision regarding extending the duration of peripherally inserted IVCs from 72 hours to 96 hours in adult patients. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Patients who are direct admissions to the telemetry unit and who have their initial IV started by a member of the IV team will be eligible. Statlock securement devices will be used to secure all IVCs. At 72 hours, study participants will be assigned to one of 3 groups: Group 1: Patients who required an IV restart prior to 72 hours (remain in study for descriptive purposes); Group 2: patients with an intact IVC randomly assigned to have IVC restarted according to current protocol; and, Group 3: patients with an intact IVC randomly assigned to have IVC kept in place until 96 hours. At 96 hours, status of IVCs for all patients initially enrolled in study will be analyzed. Data includes site, gauge, use (e.g., continuous versus intermittent fluids), frequency and type of medications, and complications (i.e., infiltration, phlebitis). Results: Ongoing. Conclusions and Implications: Data will provide evidence to support decision to continue with existing 72 hour peripheral IVC restart time or extend the restart time to 96 hours.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Timely Study: Outcomes of 72-hour and 96-hour Peripheral IV Restart Timesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHoerst, Barbara J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFox, Mary Agnesen_US
dc.contributor.authorHardy, Jeanen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara J. Hoerst, PhD, RN, La Salle University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: hoerst@lasalle.edu; Mary Agnes Fox, MSN, RN; Jean Hardy, BSN, RN, St. Mary Medical Centeren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163112-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of the Time of Restart Study is to compare the outcomes of a peripheral intravenous catheter (IVC) restart time of 72 hours with a restart time of 96 hours. Theoretical Framework: The IOWA Model of Evidence-based Practice to Promote Quality Care guides this study. Existing SMMC policy requires peripheral IV catheters to be restarted at 72 hours. The Infusion Nurses' Society (INS, 2006) has identified this as the recommended duration to prevent complications associated with use of peripheral IV catheters (e.g., phlebitis, infiltration). The CDC (2002) identifies 72 to 96 hours as the recommended time frame for changing peripheral IV sites. This study seeks evidence to assist nurses in making an informed decision regarding extending the duration of peripherally inserted IVCs from 72 hours to 96 hours in adult patients. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Patients who are direct admissions to the telemetry unit and who have their initial IV started by a member of the IV team will be eligible. Statlock securement devices will be used to secure all IVCs. At 72 hours, study participants will be assigned to one of 3 groups: Group 1: Patients who required an IV restart prior to 72 hours (remain in study for descriptive purposes); Group 2: patients with an intact IVC randomly assigned to have IVC restarted according to current protocol; and, Group 3: patients with an intact IVC randomly assigned to have IVC kept in place until 96 hours. At 96 hours, status of IVCs for all patients initially enrolled in study will be analyzed. Data includes site, gauge, use (e.g., continuous versus intermittent fluids), frequency and type of medications, and complications (i.e., infiltration, phlebitis). Results: Ongoing. Conclusions and Implications: Data will provide evidence to support decision to continue with existing 72 hour peripheral IVC restart time or extend the restart time to 96 hours.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:01:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:01:28Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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