2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163114
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pressure Ulcer Prevalence: Data Reliability and Clinical Issues
Author(s):
Hoerst, Barbara J.; Gilbert, Patrcia L.; Partyka, June
Author Details:
Barbara J. Hoerst, PhD, RN, La Salle University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: hoerst@lasalle.edu; Patricia L. Gilbert, MSN, RN; June Partyka, WOCN, RN, St. Mary Medical Center
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this session is to examine pressure ulcer prevalence data. Theoretical Framework: The IOWA Model of Evidence-based Practice to Promote Quality Care guides the efforts of the research team at SMMC. The problem was a higher than expected rate of stage 1 pressure ulcers noted in quarterly reports prepared for NDNQI. Two factors were of concern: 1) Different volunteers performed the assessments each quarter; and 2) Nurses reported a level of discomfort in their own competencies related to staging pressure ulcers. A consistent group of nurses was recruited. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A time series design was used to examine rates of pressure ulcers across units of SMMC. Data was collected by a research team who was trained in staging of pressure ulcers. Post-test data for three quarterly reports were compared to pre-program prevalence data collected as part of NDNQI reports. Results: Results for the first quarter were down for stage 1 pressure ulcers; during the second quarter, rates were down except for the rehabilitation unit and the intensive care unit. For the third quarter, rates across all units were down. Conclusions and Implications: Efforts are ongoing to ensure inter-rater reliability and in developing a program for all units related to pressure ulcer prevention. Nurses may become more interested in clinical research and evidence based practice if they can see research within a clinical situation. Nurses receive direct reinforcement by addressing clinical problems with research. Smaller institutions may be able to involve interested nurses in identifying a clinical problem and conducting a similar type of approach in which terms of research are learned as a problem is addressed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePressure Ulcer Prevalence: Data Reliability and Clinical Issuesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHoerst, Barbara J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Patrcia L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPartyka, Juneen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara J. Hoerst, PhD, RN, La Salle University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: hoerst@lasalle.edu; Patricia L. Gilbert, MSN, RN; June Partyka, WOCN, RN, St. Mary Medical Centeren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163114-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this session is to examine pressure ulcer prevalence data. Theoretical Framework: The IOWA Model of Evidence-based Practice to Promote Quality Care guides the efforts of the research team at SMMC. The problem was a higher than expected rate of stage 1 pressure ulcers noted in quarterly reports prepared for NDNQI. Two factors were of concern: 1) Different volunteers performed the assessments each quarter; and 2) Nurses reported a level of discomfort in their own competencies related to staging pressure ulcers. A consistent group of nurses was recruited. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A time series design was used to examine rates of pressure ulcers across units of SMMC. Data was collected by a research team who was trained in staging of pressure ulcers. Post-test data for three quarterly reports were compared to pre-program prevalence data collected as part of NDNQI reports. Results: Results for the first quarter were down for stage 1 pressure ulcers; during the second quarter, rates were down except for the rehabilitation unit and the intensive care unit. For the third quarter, rates across all units were down. Conclusions and Implications: Efforts are ongoing to ensure inter-rater reliability and in developing a program for all units related to pressure ulcer prevention. Nurses may become more interested in clinical research and evidence based practice if they can see research within a clinical situation. Nurses receive direct reinforcement by addressing clinical problems with research. Smaller institutions may be able to involve interested nurses in identifying a clinical problem and conducting a similar type of approach in which terms of research are learned as a problem is addressed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:01:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:01:31Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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