Do Clinicians Routinely Ask about Postpartum Depression: Lessons from the Care Project

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163116
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Do Clinicians Routinely Ask about Postpartum Depression: Lessons from the Care Project
Author(s):
Horowitz, June Andrews
Author Details:
June Andrews Horowitz, PhD, APRN, FAAN, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: horowitz@bc.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Although 10-15% of women experience postpartum depression (PPD), PPD screening is not universal standard practice. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine how often clinicians asked women how they were feeling emotionally based on experience from the CARE (Communicating and Relating Effectively Study.) Theoretical Framework: The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality framework informs this study. The pathway begins with identifying a cohort of postpartum women with unknown mood state and moves to symptom screening. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A descriptive design was used to identify a community-based sample of women with elevated PPD symptoms. After providing permission, 1,716 women who delivered at Partners Health Care hospitals in Boston completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), demographic items, and a question to determine whether or not a clinician had asked how they were feeling emotionally at four weeks postpartum. Descriptive statistics were used to examine percentages of being asked about emotional state and who asked; chi-square analysis was used to examine the association between PPD and being asked about emotional state. Results: Among women screened, 13% had elevated PPD symptoms. At four weeks postpartum, only 48.7% of women had been asked, 38.5% had not been asked, and 12.8% had not been seen by a provider. Comparison of women with and without elevated PPD symptoms indicated no significant difference in frequency of being asked. Pediatricians, obstetricians, and nurse midwives were the clinicians who most often asked. Conclusions and Implications: A large percentage of women were not queried about their emotional well-being and women with PPD symptoms were no more likely than their non-depressed counterparts to have been asked. Evidence from this research and from other studies begs the question: Is it time to make cost-effective strategies for PPD screening a universal practice? Postpartum women and their families deserve nothing less.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDo Clinicians Routinely Ask about Postpartum Depression: Lessons from the Care Projecten_GB
dc.contributor.authorHorowitz, June Andrewsen_US
dc.author.detailsJune Andrews Horowitz, PhD, APRN, FAAN, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: horowitz@bc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163116-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Although 10-15% of women experience postpartum depression (PPD), PPD screening is not universal standard practice. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine how often clinicians asked women how they were feeling emotionally based on experience from the CARE (Communicating and Relating Effectively Study.) Theoretical Framework: The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality framework informs this study. The pathway begins with identifying a cohort of postpartum women with unknown mood state and moves to symptom screening. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A descriptive design was used to identify a community-based sample of women with elevated PPD symptoms. After providing permission, 1,716 women who delivered at Partners Health Care hospitals in Boston completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), demographic items, and a question to determine whether or not a clinician had asked how they were feeling emotionally at four weeks postpartum. Descriptive statistics were used to examine percentages of being asked about emotional state and who asked; chi-square analysis was used to examine the association between PPD and being asked about emotional state. Results: Among women screened, 13% had elevated PPD symptoms. At four weeks postpartum, only 48.7% of women had been asked, 38.5% had not been asked, and 12.8% had not been seen by a provider. Comparison of women with and without elevated PPD symptoms indicated no significant difference in frequency of being asked. Pediatricians, obstetricians, and nurse midwives were the clinicians who most often asked. Conclusions and Implications: A large percentage of women were not queried about their emotional well-being and women with PPD symptoms were no more likely than their non-depressed counterparts to have been asked. Evidence from this research and from other studies begs the question: Is it time to make cost-effective strategies for PPD screening a universal practice? Postpartum women and their families deserve nothing less.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:01:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:01:33Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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