Living through the trajectory of heart failure: Palliative needs of male patients and their spousal caregivers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163117
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Living through the trajectory of heart failure: Palliative needs of male patients and their spousal caregivers
Author(s):
Hupcey, Judith E.; Penrod, Janice; Biddle, Barbara
Author Details:
Judith E. Hupcey, EdD, CRNP, The Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jxh37@psu.edu; Janice Penrod, PhD, RN; Barbara Biddle, MS, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: To enhance understanding of heart failure patients' (< age 65) and their spousal caregivers' perceptions of the need for and acceptance of palliative services across the heart failure trajectory. Background: Nearly 5 million people live with heart failure and, of these, almost 300,000 die annually. Heart failure (HF) is a growing concern with far-reaching implications ranging from the experience of living with a life-limiting condition to policy implications related to funding expensive end-of-life care. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Design: Qualitative inquiry, grounded theory methods. Participants: 10 dyads (HF patient and spousal caregiver) recruited at critical transitions in the disease trajectory (e.g., hospitalization for acute exacerbation). Setting: Initial interviews take place at the bedside or other convenient location. Subsequent interviews may take place in person in a private location or over the phone. Data Collection: Recorded interviews with each member of the dyad monthly for 6 months. Analytic Approach: Constant comparative process, by which data are collected and analyzed simultaneously, resulting in theoretical understanding of the perceptions of needs and acceptance of palliative care services across the HF trajectory. Results: Preliminary results reveal that the dyad is working together to help the care recipient "live with it." HF patients express frustration, downplaying the severity of their symptoms. Spousal caregivers acknowledge greater concern about symptoms. The dyad tends to be cautious about making plans since exacerbations unexpectedly impact everyday existence. Unmet needs permeate the experience. Conclusions and Implications: Both members of the dyad expect ongoing treatments to "fix" the problem and are subsequently disappointed when symptoms continue or worsen. The need for early, well-targeted palliative care interventions is highlighted by the persistence of unmet needs. The derived theory will aid in the determination of specific types of interventions, timing, and the care delivery system that best supports these vulnerable patients and families.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLiving through the trajectory of heart failure: Palliative needs of male patients and their spousal caregiversen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHupcey, Judith E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPenrod, Janiceen_US
dc.contributor.authorBiddle, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsJudith E. Hupcey, EdD, CRNP, The Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jxh37@psu.edu; Janice Penrod, PhD, RN; Barbara Biddle, MS, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163117-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To enhance understanding of heart failure patients' (< age 65) and their spousal caregivers' perceptions of the need for and acceptance of palliative services across the heart failure trajectory. Background: Nearly 5 million people live with heart failure and, of these, almost 300,000 die annually. Heart failure (HF) is a growing concern with far-reaching implications ranging from the experience of living with a life-limiting condition to policy implications related to funding expensive end-of-life care. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Design: Qualitative inquiry, grounded theory methods. Participants: 10 dyads (HF patient and spousal caregiver) recruited at critical transitions in the disease trajectory (e.g., hospitalization for acute exacerbation). Setting: Initial interviews take place at the bedside or other convenient location. Subsequent interviews may take place in person in a private location or over the phone. Data Collection: Recorded interviews with each member of the dyad monthly for 6 months. Analytic Approach: Constant comparative process, by which data are collected and analyzed simultaneously, resulting in theoretical understanding of the perceptions of needs and acceptance of palliative care services across the HF trajectory. Results: Preliminary results reveal that the dyad is working together to help the care recipient "live with it." HF patients express frustration, downplaying the severity of their symptoms. Spousal caregivers acknowledge greater concern about symptoms. The dyad tends to be cautious about making plans since exacerbations unexpectedly impact everyday existence. Unmet needs permeate the experience. Conclusions and Implications: Both members of the dyad expect ongoing treatments to "fix" the problem and are subsequently disappointed when symptoms continue or worsen. The need for early, well-targeted palliative care interventions is highlighted by the persistence of unmet needs. The derived theory will aid in the determination of specific types of interventions, timing, and the care delivery system that best supports these vulnerable patients and families.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:01:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:01:35Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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