Dignity in the Dining Room: A Description of Dining Practices Across Levels of Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163120
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Dignity in the Dining Room: A Description of Dining Practices Across Levels of Care
Author(s):
Jacelon, Cynthia S.; Furman, Ellen; Moore, Janet
Author Details:
Cynthia S. Jacelon, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA, email: jacelon@nursing.umass.edu; Ellen Furman; Janet Moore
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this research was to explore the meaning of human interactions as related to dignity and resident eating patterns within the dining rooms of a multi-level geriatric residence. Background: Maintaining the dignity and nutritional status of long term care residents is problematic. In the dining room where residents of many different abilities and food preferences come together for meals, staff behavior may affect both residents' dignity and their desire to eat. Dignity was conceptualized as an attributed, dynamic quality of the resident connoting self-value and behavior that demonstrates respect for self and others. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Using qualitative descriptive methods, data collection proceeded in two phases, observation and interviews. The setting was a kosher facility with a 200-bed long-term care facility, an adult day health program, and a 70 resident assisted living facility. Interactions between staff, residents, and family members during mealtimes were observed during 14 two-hour periods of observation in eight separate dining rooms. Data for this portion of the study consisted of copious field notes. Questions for individual and group interviews were generated from the observation data. Following consent, 11 nurse aides participated in group interviews (n = 5) and 7 professional staff and on resident were interviewed. Interviews were transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method. Results: Six themes were identified; environment, interactions, resident actions, meal process, dignity and nutrition. Conclusions and Implications: System risk factors for resident under-nutrition included staff attention focused on residents that require feeding and not those that require other types of assistance, minimal staff/resident ratios, and culturally inappropriate foods. The staff demonstrated profound commitment to maintaining the dignity of residents and the belief that this is the residents' home. Quality improvement projects and system redesign are planned to enhance the dining experience.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDignity in the Dining Room: A Description of Dining Practices Across Levels of Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJacelon, Cynthia S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFurman, Ellenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Janeten_US
dc.author.detailsCynthia S. Jacelon, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA, email: jacelon@nursing.umass.edu; Ellen Furman; Janet Mooreen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163120-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this research was to explore the meaning of human interactions as related to dignity and resident eating patterns within the dining rooms of a multi-level geriatric residence. Background: Maintaining the dignity and nutritional status of long term care residents is problematic. In the dining room where residents of many different abilities and food preferences come together for meals, staff behavior may affect both residents' dignity and their desire to eat. Dignity was conceptualized as an attributed, dynamic quality of the resident connoting self-value and behavior that demonstrates respect for self and others. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Using qualitative descriptive methods, data collection proceeded in two phases, observation and interviews. The setting was a kosher facility with a 200-bed long-term care facility, an adult day health program, and a 70 resident assisted living facility. Interactions between staff, residents, and family members during mealtimes were observed during 14 two-hour periods of observation in eight separate dining rooms. Data for this portion of the study consisted of copious field notes. Questions for individual and group interviews were generated from the observation data. Following consent, 11 nurse aides participated in group interviews (n = 5) and 7 professional staff and on resident were interviewed. Interviews were transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method. Results: Six themes were identified; environment, interactions, resident actions, meal process, dignity and nutrition. Conclusions and Implications: System risk factors for resident under-nutrition included staff attention focused on residents that require feeding and not those that require other types of assistance, minimal staff/resident ratios, and culturally inappropriate foods. The staff demonstrated profound commitment to maintaining the dignity of residents and the belief that this is the residents' home. Quality improvement projects and system redesign are planned to enhance the dining experience.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:01:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:01:39Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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