Changing Women's HIV Risk: A Pilot Study Testing the Acceptability and Feasibility of Soap Opera Video Vignettes on Hand Held Computers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163123
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Changing Women's HIV Risk: A Pilot Study Testing the Acceptability and Feasibility of Soap Opera Video Vignettes on Hand Held Computers
Author(s):
Jones, Rachel
Author Details:
Rachel Jones, EdD, PhD, RN, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: racjones@rutgers.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Conduct a pilot study on the acceptability and feasibility of producing a soap opera video vignette to reduce HIV sexual risk in urban women, for viewing on hand held computers. Theoretical Framework: Heterosexual transmission accounts for 79% of HIV infection in women. Previous findings indicate women may be following high-risk sex scripts involving unprotected sex. Stories were developed from focus groups. Barrett's theory of power as knowing participation in change and sex script theory guided story development. By popularizing high-power sex scripts and associating these with normative sex scripts, new health promoting behaviors are more likely to be adopted. This argument is based on models of associative memory processing. The heroine revisits each high-risk scene and reenacts it with power, making different choices and actualizing her potential. The viewer becomes involved in the character's dilemmas and how each transition to high-power sex scripts. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Design: Experimental, randomized, control, pretest/post-test. Sample: 76 women, 18 to 29, in sexual relationships with men. 85.5 % African American, 10.5% Latina. Setting: Public housing in Jersey City, downtown storefront office in Newark. Measures: 43-minute experimental video, 43-minute control video on healthcare and computer careers, Sex Script Video Scale, Sexual Pressure Scale, Relevance of Videos, Computer Acceptability Scale. Data Collection: Audio Computer Assisted Self-Interview on hand-held computers. Analysis: descriptives, multivariate ANOVA. Results: Change in pretest-post test mean scores differed significantly by group. In the control group (n=38), the difference was .42. In the experimental group (n=38), the difference was 5.18 or .72 standard deviations lower (risk), a moderate to large effect. The entire experimental group felt the video could help women with men who won't use condoms. Both groups enjoyed watching videos on hand held computers. Conclusions and Implications: The soap opera video vignettes on hand-held computers are an acceptable and feasible methodology. The potential for behavior change will be assessed in an upcoming longitudinal study.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChanging Women's HIV Risk: A Pilot Study Testing the Acceptability and Feasibility of Soap Opera Video Vignettes on Hand Held Computersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJones, Rachelen_US
dc.author.detailsRachel Jones, EdD, PhD, RN, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: racjones@rutgers.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163123-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Conduct a pilot study on the acceptability and feasibility of producing a soap opera video vignette to reduce HIV sexual risk in urban women, for viewing on hand held computers. Theoretical Framework: Heterosexual transmission accounts for 79% of HIV infection in women. Previous findings indicate women may be following high-risk sex scripts involving unprotected sex. Stories were developed from focus groups. Barrett's theory of power as knowing participation in change and sex script theory guided story development. By popularizing high-power sex scripts and associating these with normative sex scripts, new health promoting behaviors are more likely to be adopted. This argument is based on models of associative memory processing. The heroine revisits each high-risk scene and reenacts it with power, making different choices and actualizing her potential. The viewer becomes involved in the character's dilemmas and how each transition to high-power sex scripts. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Design: Experimental, randomized, control, pretest/post-test. Sample: 76 women, 18 to 29, in sexual relationships with men. 85.5 % African American, 10.5% Latina. Setting: Public housing in Jersey City, downtown storefront office in Newark. Measures: 43-minute experimental video, 43-minute control video on healthcare and computer careers, Sex Script Video Scale, Sexual Pressure Scale, Relevance of Videos, Computer Acceptability Scale. Data Collection: Audio Computer Assisted Self-Interview on hand-held computers. Analysis: descriptives, multivariate ANOVA. Results: Change in pretest-post test mean scores differed significantly by group. In the control group (n=38), the difference was .42. In the experimental group (n=38), the difference was 5.18 or .72 standard deviations lower (risk), a moderate to large effect. The entire experimental group felt the video could help women with men who won't use condoms. Both groups enjoyed watching videos on hand held computers. Conclusions and Implications: The soap opera video vignettes on hand-held computers are an acceptable and feasible methodology. The potential for behavior change will be assessed in an upcoming longitudinal study.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:01:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:01:42Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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