2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163127
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Which Influence the Health Seeking Behaviors of Acute Stroke Patients
Author(s):
Kitko, Lisa A.
Author Details:
Lisa A. Kitko, RN, PhD(c), CCRN, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: lah150@psu.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to discover factors that influence the decision-making process of seeking treatment by acute stroke patients. Background: Stroke is the third leading cause of death and the leading cause of serious, long-term adult disability in the United States. Historically, there has been no treatment for ischemic strokes, but recent advances have been made. The effectiveness of the therapies is highly time-dependent and acute stroke patients often arrive at the hospital too late to receive maximum benefit. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Design: Qualitative study using the methods of grounded theory. The Health Belief Model (HBM) used as a framework to explore perceptions of susceptibility, severity or seriousness, and benefits and barriers associated with seeking care for an acute stroke. Participants: Ten patients and/or caregivers of patients following an acute stroke. Setting: Participants were recruited from a community hospital shortly after the patient's admission. If the patient was unable to communicate secondary to aphasia, caregivers were interviewed if they were present during the decision-making process to seek treatment. Data Collection: In-depth interviews were conducted after admission to the hospital. Interviews focused on factors that influenced the decision to seek early treatment. Analytic Approach: Constant comparative process where data collection and analysis occur simultaneously. Themes were identified and grouped based on the HBM. Results: Numerous factors influenced the decision to seek early treatment including knowledge about strokes, living arrangements, and time stroke symptoms appeared. Past experiences and severity of symptoms also influenced decisions in patients who presented both late and early for treatment. Conclusions and Implications: There remains a lack of knowledge regarding: signs and symptoms, especially if initial symptoms are not severe; risk factors; and treatment of stroke. Implications for nursing practice include first and foremost, education. Replication of this study in other geographic areas is warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Which Influence the Health Seeking Behaviors of Acute Stroke Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKitko, Lisa A.en_US
dc.author.detailsLisa A. Kitko, RN, PhD(c), CCRN, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: lah150@psu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163127-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to discover factors that influence the decision-making process of seeking treatment by acute stroke patients. Background: Stroke is the third leading cause of death and the leading cause of serious, long-term adult disability in the United States. Historically, there has been no treatment for ischemic strokes, but recent advances have been made. The effectiveness of the therapies is highly time-dependent and acute stroke patients often arrive at the hospital too late to receive maximum benefit. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Design: Qualitative study using the methods of grounded theory. The Health Belief Model (HBM) used as a framework to explore perceptions of susceptibility, severity or seriousness, and benefits and barriers associated with seeking care for an acute stroke. Participants: Ten patients and/or caregivers of patients following an acute stroke. Setting: Participants were recruited from a community hospital shortly after the patient's admission. If the patient was unable to communicate secondary to aphasia, caregivers were interviewed if they were present during the decision-making process to seek treatment. Data Collection: In-depth interviews were conducted after admission to the hospital. Interviews focused on factors that influenced the decision to seek early treatment. Analytic Approach: Constant comparative process where data collection and analysis occur simultaneously. Themes were identified and grouped based on the HBM. Results: Numerous factors influenced the decision to seek early treatment including knowledge about strokes, living arrangements, and time stroke symptoms appeared. Past experiences and severity of symptoms also influenced decisions in patients who presented both late and early for treatment. Conclusions and Implications: There remains a lack of knowledge regarding: signs and symptoms, especially if initial symptoms are not severe; risk factors; and treatment of stroke. Implications for nursing practice include first and foremost, education. Replication of this study in other geographic areas is warranted.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:01:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:01:47Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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