2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163128
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A New Measure for Assessing Family Management of Chronic Conditions in Childhood
Author(s):
Knafl, Kathleen; Deatrick, Janet A.; Gallo, Agatha; Dixon, Jane K.; Grey, Margaret; Knafl, George
Author Details:
Kathleen Knafl, PhD, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: knaflk@ohsu.edu; Janet A. Deatrick, PhD, RN, FAAN, University of Pennsylvania; Agatha Gallo, PhD, RN FAAN, University of Illinois at Chicago; Jane K. Dixon, PhD, Yale University School of Nursing; Margaret Grey, DrPH, RN, FAAN, Yale University; George Knafl, PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to describe efforts to evaluate the psychometric properties of a new measure of family management of a child's chronic condition, the Family Management Measure (FMM). Theoretical Framework: The FMM was based on the Family Management Style Framework. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Testing of the FMM was completed with a sample of 579 parents from 417 families of children with a wide array of chronic conditions (including 162 families from which two parents participated). Parents responded to the 65-item FMM as well as to measures of family functioning (Family Assessment Device), child adaptation (Eyeberg Child behavior Inventory), and child functional status (Functional Status Measure II). Analyses included reliability assessment, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, and hypothesis testing to evaluate construct validity. Calculations of reliability and validity were modified to account for inter-parental correlations in families with two participating parents. Results: Five summated scales measuring the dimensions of child identity, concern, difficulty, effort, and manageability were identified. A sixth scale, mutuality, was identified for partnered respondents. Using these modified formulas to account for inter-parental correlations, internal consistency reliability for the scales ranged from .72 to .90. Test-retest reliability, based on responses from 65 parents retested within 2-4 weeks, ranged from .75 to .94. Construct validity was supported by significant correlations of weak to moderate strength between each of the scales and each of the related measures, with directions of relationships as expected. Family functioning, child adaptation, and child functional status were positively associated with more normal child identity, manageability, and mutuality and negatively associated with more concern, difficulty, and effort. Correlations with social desirability were non-significant for all but the mutuality scale. Conclusions and Implications: The analysis supports the reliability and validity of the FMM. The FMM will further researchers' ability to generate knowledge of the family context of childhood chronic conditions.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA New Measure for Assessing Family Management of Chronic Conditions in Childhooden_GB
dc.contributor.authorKnafl, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorDeatrick, Janet A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGallo, Agathaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDixon, Jane K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrey, Margareten_US
dc.contributor.authorKnafl, Georgeen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen Knafl, PhD, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: knaflk@ohsu.edu; Janet A. Deatrick, PhD, RN, FAAN, University of Pennsylvania; Agatha Gallo, PhD, RN FAAN, University of Illinois at Chicago; Jane K. Dixon, PhD, Yale University School of Nursing; Margaret Grey, DrPH, RN, FAAN, Yale University; George Knafl, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163128-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this presentation is to describe efforts to evaluate the psychometric properties of a new measure of family management of a child's chronic condition, the Family Management Measure (FMM). Theoretical Framework: The FMM was based on the Family Management Style Framework. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Testing of the FMM was completed with a sample of 579 parents from 417 families of children with a wide array of chronic conditions (including 162 families from which two parents participated). Parents responded to the 65-item FMM as well as to measures of family functioning (Family Assessment Device), child adaptation (Eyeberg Child behavior Inventory), and child functional status (Functional Status Measure II). Analyses included reliability assessment, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, and hypothesis testing to evaluate construct validity. Calculations of reliability and validity were modified to account for inter-parental correlations in families with two participating parents. Results: Five summated scales measuring the dimensions of child identity, concern, difficulty, effort, and manageability were identified. A sixth scale, mutuality, was identified for partnered respondents. Using these modified formulas to account for inter-parental correlations, internal consistency reliability for the scales ranged from .72 to .90. Test-retest reliability, based on responses from 65 parents retested within 2-4 weeks, ranged from .75 to .94. Construct validity was supported by significant correlations of weak to moderate strength between each of the scales and each of the related measures, with directions of relationships as expected. Family functioning, child adaptation, and child functional status were positively associated with more normal child identity, manageability, and mutuality and negatively associated with more concern, difficulty, and effort. Correlations with social desirability were non-significant for all but the mutuality scale. Conclusions and Implications: The analysis supports the reliability and validity of the FMM. The FMM will further researchers' ability to generate knowledge of the family context of childhood chronic conditions.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:01:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:01:48Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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