2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163130
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hear Our Voices: Men Discuss Their Careers in Nursing
Author(s):
LaRocco, Susan A.
Author Details:
Susan A. LaRocco, RN, PhD, Curry College, Milton, Massachusetts, USA, email: slarocco0603@curry.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this research is to increase our knowledge of the history of men in nursing and to increase the recruitment of men into nursing. Background: Male nurses represent approximately 6% of all nurses in the United States. Although men have made many contributions to nursing, their story is seldom told. In nursing textbooks, the discussion of nursing history often begins with Florence Nightingale. At best, the authors make a passing reference to the earliest nurses, the Hospitalers and members of other monastic orders who established and staffed hospitals during the Middle Ages. Methods (sources, analytic approach): Audio-taped interviews have been conducted with men who became licensed as Registered Nurses in the 1940s through the 1960s. These interviews are transcribed, edited for accuracy, reviewed by the participant and then analyzed using Max QDA, software that assists with qualitative data management. Results: Men who entered nursing in the 1940s through the 1960s frequently attended all male schools of nursing. Some of these men belonged to religious orders when they studied nursing. The men's contributions to nursing, their experiences as students, and their perceptions about nursing as a career for men are discussed. Whether these nurses spent their career practicing nursing or were employed in some other aspect of health care, their nursing education shaped their values. Conclusions and Implications: Although very few men chose nursing as a career more than 30 years ago, many of the men who did become nurses have had long and satisfying careers. Their love for nursing and their perception of nursing as a career that provides a service to mankind as well as tremendous personal satisfaction may be inspirational to young men and boys who are considering their future life's work.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHear Our Voices: Men Discuss Their Careers in Nursingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLaRocco, Susan A.en_US
dc.author.detailsSusan A. LaRocco, RN, PhD, Curry College, Milton, Massachusetts, USA, email: slarocco0603@curry.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163130-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this research is to increase our knowledge of the history of men in nursing and to increase the recruitment of men into nursing. Background: Male nurses represent approximately 6% of all nurses in the United States. Although men have made many contributions to nursing, their story is seldom told. In nursing textbooks, the discussion of nursing history often begins with Florence Nightingale. At best, the authors make a passing reference to the earliest nurses, the Hospitalers and members of other monastic orders who established and staffed hospitals during the Middle Ages. Methods (sources, analytic approach): Audio-taped interviews have been conducted with men who became licensed as Registered Nurses in the 1940s through the 1960s. These interviews are transcribed, edited for accuracy, reviewed by the participant and then analyzed using Max QDA, software that assists with qualitative data management. Results: Men who entered nursing in the 1940s through the 1960s frequently attended all male schools of nursing. Some of these men belonged to religious orders when they studied nursing. The men's contributions to nursing, their experiences as students, and their perceptions about nursing as a career for men are discussed. Whether these nurses spent their career practicing nursing or were employed in some other aspect of health care, their nursing education shaped their values. Conclusions and Implications: Although very few men chose nursing as a career more than 30 years ago, many of the men who did become nurses have had long and satisfying careers. Their love for nursing and their perception of nursing as a career that provides a service to mankind as well as tremendous personal satisfaction may be inspirational to young men and boys who are considering their future life's work.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:01:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:01:51Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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