2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163133
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Collaborative Governance Evaluation: Strategies to Improve Understanding
Author(s):
Lee, Susan M.
Author Details:
Susan M. Lee, PhD, RN, FNP, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: slee40@partners.org
Abstract:
Purpose: Evaluating a collaborative governance structure is one of the work environment studies periodically conducted by nurse scientists at our Magnet hospital. While it is relatively easy to collect the data and perform the analyses, understanding its meaning in the context of complex systems is more challenging. The purpose of this presentation is to describe strategies we used that resulted in deeper understanding of collaborative governance and its impact on clinicians and their work environments. Theoretical Framework: Kanter's Theory of Structural Power in Organizations guided the study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A cross sectional, mixed methods design was used. Ninety-five collaborative governance members and 125 non-members participated in the study. The findings were then compared with previous years for a total of 1069 subjects. The setting was a large, tertiary care, Magnet hospital in the northeast. Four instruments were administered: Conditions for Work Effectiveness, Job Activity Scale, Organizational Relationship Scale, and Psychological Empowerment Scale as well as eight, open-ended items. ANOVA, multiple regression, and qualitative description were used. Results: Collaborative governance members scored higher on structural and psychological empowerment than their counterparts. Formal and informal power explained 53% of the variance in structural empowerment; structural empowerment explained 36% of the variance in psychological empowerment. Demographic variables of age, experience, tenure, and education were not significant predictors of empowerment. Qualitative data described the experience of participating in collaborative governance as engaging work, being part of the group, making a difference, connecting with the hospital, taking on new challenges, and transforming me. Conclusions and Implications: Several strategies used by the nurse scientists to enhance the usefulness of this data were: using mixed methods, evaluating qualitative data from two perspectives, comparing findings to emerging concepts in the literature, and enlisting a community of scholars for critical reflection.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCollaborative Governance Evaluation: Strategies to Improve Understandingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLee, Susan M.en_US
dc.author.detailsSusan M. Lee, PhD, RN, FNP, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: slee40@partners.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163133-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Evaluating a collaborative governance structure is one of the work environment studies periodically conducted by nurse scientists at our Magnet hospital. While it is relatively easy to collect the data and perform the analyses, understanding its meaning in the context of complex systems is more challenging. The purpose of this presentation is to describe strategies we used that resulted in deeper understanding of collaborative governance and its impact on clinicians and their work environments. Theoretical Framework: Kanter's Theory of Structural Power in Organizations guided the study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A cross sectional, mixed methods design was used. Ninety-five collaborative governance members and 125 non-members participated in the study. The findings were then compared with previous years for a total of 1069 subjects. The setting was a large, tertiary care, Magnet hospital in the northeast. Four instruments were administered: Conditions for Work Effectiveness, Job Activity Scale, Organizational Relationship Scale, and Psychological Empowerment Scale as well as eight, open-ended items. ANOVA, multiple regression, and qualitative description were used. Results: Collaborative governance members scored higher on structural and psychological empowerment than their counterparts. Formal and informal power explained 53% of the variance in structural empowerment; structural empowerment explained 36% of the variance in psychological empowerment. Demographic variables of age, experience, tenure, and education were not significant predictors of empowerment. Qualitative data described the experience of participating in collaborative governance as engaging work, being part of the group, making a difference, connecting with the hospital, taking on new challenges, and transforming me. Conclusions and Implications: Several strategies used by the nurse scientists to enhance the usefulness of this data were: using mixed methods, evaluating qualitative data from two perspectives, comparing findings to emerging concepts in the literature, and enlisting a community of scholars for critical reflection.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:01:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:01:54Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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