2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163135
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
In Their Own Words: Older Male Prisoners' Health Beliefs and Fears for the Future
Author(s):
Loeb, Susan J.; Steffensmeier, Darrell; Myco, Priscilla M.
Author Details:
Susan J. Loeb, PhD, RN, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: SVL100@PSU.EDU; Darrell Steffensmeier, PhD; Priscilla M. Myco
Abstract:
Purpose: To describe older male inmates' health beliefs, desires, and anticipated challenges upon release from prison. Background: Prisons are experiencing an exponential growth in the number of older inmates who have disproportionately higher rates of health problems. Identifying challenges to the health of older inmates and effectively addressing them can improve prisoners' health and holds promise for positively impacting the health of their families, peers, and communities where they eventually settle. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Qualitative data were obtained from open ended survey questions for this descriptive study of 51 male inmates from a minimum security Pennsylvania State Correctional Institution. Data were analyzed using content analysis. Results: Responses of inmates reporting worsening health since incarceration indicated exacerbations in or new diagnosis of diseases, or deterioration in overall fitness. In contrast, improvements in health since incarceration were attributed to engaging in more positive health behaviors or developing better disease control. Those who expressed confidence in their health self-management abilities while in prison attributed that confidence to engaging in health promotion behaviors, body listening, or having access to the healthcare system. Those without confidence spoke of lack of responsiveness by prison administration and lack of health resources. Inmates recommended new prison health programs focusing on health promotion, screening, and disease management. Fears about management of their health upon release focused on challenges to accessing/paying for health care, as well as returning to previous destructive behaviors. Conclusions and Implications: Nurses are well positioned to take inmates' insights and translate them into steps for: preventing health deteriorations experienced by older prisoners; advocating for health policy changes which hold promise for cost savings for the public treasury; increasing student nurses' awareness of the health issues faced by this particularly vulnerable group of elders; and focusing increased research attention to a group that has been largely overlooked by the field of gerontology.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIn Their Own Words: Older Male Prisoners' Health Beliefs and Fears for the Futureen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLoeb, Susan J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSteffensmeier, Darrellen_US
dc.contributor.authorMyco, Priscilla M.en_US
dc.author.detailsSusan J. Loeb, PhD, RN, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: SVL100@PSU.EDU; Darrell Steffensmeier, PhD; Priscilla M. Mycoen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163135-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To describe older male inmates' health beliefs, desires, and anticipated challenges upon release from prison. Background: Prisons are experiencing an exponential growth in the number of older inmates who have disproportionately higher rates of health problems. Identifying challenges to the health of older inmates and effectively addressing them can improve prisoners' health and holds promise for positively impacting the health of their families, peers, and communities where they eventually settle. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Qualitative data were obtained from open ended survey questions for this descriptive study of 51 male inmates from a minimum security Pennsylvania State Correctional Institution. Data were analyzed using content analysis. Results: Responses of inmates reporting worsening health since incarceration indicated exacerbations in or new diagnosis of diseases, or deterioration in overall fitness. In contrast, improvements in health since incarceration were attributed to engaging in more positive health behaviors or developing better disease control. Those who expressed confidence in their health self-management abilities while in prison attributed that confidence to engaging in health promotion behaviors, body listening, or having access to the healthcare system. Those without confidence spoke of lack of responsiveness by prison administration and lack of health resources. Inmates recommended new prison health programs focusing on health promotion, screening, and disease management. Fears about management of their health upon release focused on challenges to accessing/paying for health care, as well as returning to previous destructive behaviors. Conclusions and Implications: Nurses are well positioned to take inmates' insights and translate them into steps for: preventing health deteriorations experienced by older prisoners; advocating for health policy changes which hold promise for cost savings for the public treasury; increasing student nurses' awareness of the health issues faced by this particularly vulnerable group of elders; and focusing increased research attention to a group that has been largely overlooked by the field of gerontology.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:01:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:01:56Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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