2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163137
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Verbal Fluency and Moderate Drinking in Older Women
Author(s):
Masters, Joan A.; Stevenson, Joanne S.
Author Details:
Joan A. Masters, RN, PhD, GNP, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA, email: mastersj@duq.edu; Joanne S. Stevenson, PHD, Ohio State University and Mount Carmel College of Nursing
Abstract:
Purpose: To determine the association between moderate drinking and performance on verbal fluency tests in older women. Theoretical Framework: Ryback's Continuity Theory asserts that the relationship between alcohol and cognitive function is linear. In other words, compared to abstainers, moderate drinkers exhibit subtle but measurable decrements in cognitive function. Heavier drinkers exhibit more apparent decrements that culminate in Korsakoff's syndrome. Recent reports of improved cognitive function in moderate drinking women and a decreased risk of dementia for all moderate drinkers have been published. Given population aging, the incidence of dementia, and the assertion that moderate drinking is cardioprotective, clarification of the association between moderate drinking and cognitive function in older adults is imperative. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A sample of 50 women (> age 60) was recruited for this study by newspaper announcements. Alcohol intake was estimated by self-report and validated by T-ACE scores and hematological indices. The associations among alcohol intake, demographic variables, and performance on the Thurstone Word Fluency Test and the Category Word Fluency Test (estimates of frontal lobe function) was determined by multiple regression. Results: T-ACE scores (p< .001) and hematological indices (ggt, p =.005; mcv, p = .056) validated self-reported alcohol consumption. Performance on the word fluency tests was not significantly related to alcohol intake (Thurstone, p =.99; Categories Test p = .54). Only age was significantly related to performance on a word fluency test (Categories Test, p=.002). Conclusions and Implications: The results of this study fail to support either Ryback's Continuity Theory or the hypothesis that moderate drinking improves cognitive function. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that, in terms of frontal lobe function, moderate drinking by older women is physiologically neutral.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVerbal Fluency and Moderate Drinking in Older Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMasters, Joan A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStevenson, Joanne S.en_US
dc.author.detailsJoan A. Masters, RN, PhD, GNP, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA, email: mastersj@duq.edu; Joanne S. Stevenson, PHD, Ohio State University and Mount Carmel College of Nursingen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163137-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To determine the association between moderate drinking and performance on verbal fluency tests in older women. Theoretical Framework: Ryback's Continuity Theory asserts that the relationship between alcohol and cognitive function is linear. In other words, compared to abstainers, moderate drinkers exhibit subtle but measurable decrements in cognitive function. Heavier drinkers exhibit more apparent decrements that culminate in Korsakoff's syndrome. Recent reports of improved cognitive function in moderate drinking women and a decreased risk of dementia for all moderate drinkers have been published. Given population aging, the incidence of dementia, and the assertion that moderate drinking is cardioprotective, clarification of the association between moderate drinking and cognitive function in older adults is imperative. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A sample of 50 women (> age 60) was recruited for this study by newspaper announcements. Alcohol intake was estimated by self-report and validated by T-ACE scores and hematological indices. The associations among alcohol intake, demographic variables, and performance on the Thurstone Word Fluency Test and the Category Word Fluency Test (estimates of frontal lobe function) was determined by multiple regression. Results: T-ACE scores (p< .001) and hematological indices (ggt, p =.005; mcv, p = .056) validated self-reported alcohol consumption. Performance on the word fluency tests was not significantly related to alcohol intake (Thurstone, p =.99; Categories Test p = .54). Only age was significantly related to performance on a word fluency test (Categories Test, p=.002). Conclusions and Implications: The results of this study fail to support either Ryback's Continuity Theory or the hypothesis that moderate drinking improves cognitive function. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that, in terms of frontal lobe function, moderate drinking by older women is physiologically neutral.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:01:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:01:59Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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