Disclosing Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Qualitative Inquiry into the Silence of Female Survivors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163139
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Disclosing Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Qualitative Inquiry into the Silence of Female Survivors
Author(s):
McClain, Natalie; Beal, Judy A.
Author Details:
Natalie McClain, PhD, RN, CPNP, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: n.mcclain@neu.edu; Judy A. Beal, DNSc, RN, Simmons College
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of the study was to describe the survivors' perception of the disclosure process following childhood sexual abuse. The specific aim was to develop a grounded theory of the disclosure process of survivor's age 18 to 35 years old with a self-identified history of childhood sexual abuse by an acquaintance or family member. Background: Since the 1970's there has been growing interest in understanding of the impact of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and designing interventions to prevent abuse. A review of recent research indicates despite the alarming number of reported and confirmed cases, CSA largely remains a crime that is undisclosed and underreported. Therefore it is necessary to learn more about the disclosure process and how to help move children and adults from silence to disclosure. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): The method was a qualitative, grounded theory. Participants included 24 females who self-identified as survivors of CSA before the age of 18 by a person known to them. Age ranged from 18-35 y.o. (M=23.5). Data were collected from a University setting in a Rural town in Virginia and the Boston Metropolitan area via audiotaped, face-to-face interviews lasting approximately 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Analysis was conducted using the coding strategies for the development of a grounded theory (Strauss & Corbin). Results: Participants in this study discussed how the secret of their abuse followed them throughout their life. Disclosing childhood sexual abuse is a complex process that appears to be influenced by a number of different variables. Barriers to disclosing included the inability to label as abuse, shame, self-blame, fear of not being believed, & protecting others. Few facilitators were identified. Conclusions and Implications: It is important to gain a better understand the process of disclosure. Assumptions can not be made that a child is lying if they disclose parts to one person and not another.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDisclosing Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Qualitative Inquiry into the Silence of Female Survivorsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcClain, Natalieen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeal, Judy A.en_US
dc.author.detailsNatalie McClain, PhD, RN, CPNP, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: n.mcclain@neu.edu; Judy A. Beal, DNSc, RN, Simmons Collegeen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163139-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of the study was to describe the survivors' perception of the disclosure process following childhood sexual abuse. The specific aim was to develop a grounded theory of the disclosure process of survivor's age 18 to 35 years old with a self-identified history of childhood sexual abuse by an acquaintance or family member. Background: Since the 1970's there has been growing interest in understanding of the impact of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and designing interventions to prevent abuse. A review of recent research indicates despite the alarming number of reported and confirmed cases, CSA largely remains a crime that is undisclosed and underreported. Therefore it is necessary to learn more about the disclosure process and how to help move children and adults from silence to disclosure. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): The method was a qualitative, grounded theory. Participants included 24 females who self-identified as survivors of CSA before the age of 18 by a person known to them. Age ranged from 18-35 y.o. (M=23.5). Data were collected from a University setting in a Rural town in Virginia and the Boston Metropolitan area via audiotaped, face-to-face interviews lasting approximately 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Analysis was conducted using the coding strategies for the development of a grounded theory (Strauss & Corbin). Results: Participants in this study discussed how the secret of their abuse followed them throughout their life. Disclosing childhood sexual abuse is a complex process that appears to be influenced by a number of different variables. Barriers to disclosing included the inability to label as abuse, shame, self-blame, fear of not being believed, & protecting others. Few facilitators were identified. Conclusions and Implications: It is important to gain a better understand the process of disclosure. Assumptions can not be made that a child is lying if they disclose parts to one person and not another.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:01Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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