2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163140
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Spiritual Comfort
Author(s):
McClune, Amy
Author Details:
Amy McClune, PhD, RN, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, Edinboro, Pennsylvania, USA, email: amcclune@edinboro.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: This focused analysis discovered the uses of religion and spirituality by nurses throughout differing specialties. Qualitative data from a larger study was used to examine spiritual comfort provided by nurses. Background: Spiritual care includes being present with those who are undergoing suffering or tragedy. Spiritual comfort provides hope in uncertain circumstances through compassion conveyed by the nurse. In addition, often the nurse receives comfort and internal reward for extending this very personal intervention. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Eighteen nurses were interviewed within the context of Kolcaba's Comfort Framework. Questions focused on interventions provided within the four contexts of comfort - physical, sociocultural, psychospiritual, and environmental. Both male and female nurses with an average experience of 18.1 years were interviewed. Practice settings varied from community, women's health, long term care, acute and critical care as well as emergency nursing. Content analysis was used to explore the interviews. Results: Content analysis of the interviews focusing on spiritual aspects revealed the use of spirituality and religion in all areas represented. Interventions included prayer, use of religious symbols and general respect for spiritual and religious needs. In addition, the interviews presented a sense of the importance of spirituality and religion within the nurses. Conclusions and Implications: The compassion exhibited in the interviews suggests that spirituality and religion runs deep within many nurses. This equips nurses with the ability to comfort by providing hope to patients as well as the expansion of their own spirituality. Future research to define and quantify the effects of these interventions on both patients and nurses will be explored.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpiritual Comforten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcClune, Amyen_US
dc.author.detailsAmy McClune, PhD, RN, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, Edinboro, Pennsylvania, USA, email: amcclune@edinboro.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163140-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This focused analysis discovered the uses of religion and spirituality by nurses throughout differing specialties. Qualitative data from a larger study was used to examine spiritual comfort provided by nurses. Background: Spiritual care includes being present with those who are undergoing suffering or tragedy. Spiritual comfort provides hope in uncertain circumstances through compassion conveyed by the nurse. In addition, often the nurse receives comfort and internal reward for extending this very personal intervention. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Eighteen nurses were interviewed within the context of Kolcaba's Comfort Framework. Questions focused on interventions provided within the four contexts of comfort - physical, sociocultural, psychospiritual, and environmental. Both male and female nurses with an average experience of 18.1 years were interviewed. Practice settings varied from community, women's health, long term care, acute and critical care as well as emergency nursing. Content analysis was used to explore the interviews. Results: Content analysis of the interviews focusing on spiritual aspects revealed the use of spirituality and religion in all areas represented. Interventions included prayer, use of religious symbols and general respect for spiritual and religious needs. In addition, the interviews presented a sense of the importance of spirituality and religion within the nurses. Conclusions and Implications: The compassion exhibited in the interviews suggests that spirituality and religion runs deep within many nurses. This equips nurses with the ability to comfort by providing hope to patients as well as the expansion of their own spirituality. Future research to define and quantify the effects of these interventions on both patients and nurses will be explored.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:02Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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