Testing the Effect of Critical Information on Planned Use of Over the Counter Analgesics

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163141
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Testing the Effect of Critical Information on Planned Use of Over the Counter Analgesics
Author(s):
McDonald, Deborah Dillon; Amendola, Mary Grace; Interlandi, Elsa; Inthavong, Susada; Lewchik, Brent; Li, Ling; Pace, Noreen; Poulose, Lissy; Wall, Karen
Author Details:
Deborah Dillon McDonald, RN, PhD, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: deborah.mcdonald@uconn.edu; Mary Grace Amendola; Elsa Interlandi; Susada Inthavong; Brent Lewchik; Ling Li; Noreen Pace; Lissy Poulose; Karen Wall
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose was to test the effect on planned use of over the counter (OTC) analgesics of adding important information to the FDA's safe use of OTC analgesics pamphlet. Theoretical Framework: Inclusion of vital health education information significantly impacts healthy choices. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): The design was a post test only, double blind randomized experiment with a comparison group reading the FDA's safe use of OTC analgesics pamphlet; and the treatment group reading the FDA pamphlet with added information regarding non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ceiling effects, NSAID interaction with blood pressure medication, and acetaminophen interaction with alcohol. A total of 137 community dwelling adults read the treatment or comparison pamphlet, and responded to six questions developed for the study to test intention to safely use OTC analgesics. A 0 to 10 scale with 0, not likely and 10 highly likely, was used. Results: No significant difference emerged between the two groups for intended safe use of OTC analgesics. Intention to give someone acetaminophen when that person was taking antihypertensive medication was associated with intention to give Advil (r = .38, p < .001), and Aleve (r = .38, p < .001), and intention to give acetaminophen to someone who drinks three or more drinks of alcohol a day (r = .42, p < .001). Intention to give Aleve was associated with intention to give Advil when that person was taking antihypertensive medication (r = .65, p < .001). Conclusions and Implications: Reading the FDA pamphlet with additional information resulted in no significant increase in safe planned use of OTC analgesics. Results suggest patterns of unsafe indiscriminant use of OTC analgesics. Additional education about safe use of OTC analgesics via television public service announcements, or by health care practitioners, and pharmacists might provide a more effective way to teach the public to discriminate between safe and unsafe use of OTC analgesics.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTesting the Effect of Critical Information on Planned Use of Over the Counter Analgesicsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Deborah Dillonen_US
dc.contributor.authorAmendola, Mary Graceen_US
dc.contributor.authorInterlandi, Elsaen_US
dc.contributor.authorInthavong, Susadaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLewchik, Brenten_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Lingen_US
dc.contributor.authorPace, Noreenen_US
dc.contributor.authorPoulose, Lissyen_US
dc.contributor.authorWall, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah Dillon McDonald, RN, PhD, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: deborah.mcdonald@uconn.edu; Mary Grace Amendola; Elsa Interlandi; Susada Inthavong; Brent Lewchik; Ling Li; Noreen Pace; Lissy Poulose; Karen Wallen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163141-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose was to test the effect on planned use of over the counter (OTC) analgesics of adding important information to the FDA's safe use of OTC analgesics pamphlet. Theoretical Framework: Inclusion of vital health education information significantly impacts healthy choices. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): The design was a post test only, double blind randomized experiment with a comparison group reading the FDA's safe use of OTC analgesics pamphlet; and the treatment group reading the FDA pamphlet with added information regarding non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ceiling effects, NSAID interaction with blood pressure medication, and acetaminophen interaction with alcohol. A total of 137 community dwelling adults read the treatment or comparison pamphlet, and responded to six questions developed for the study to test intention to safely use OTC analgesics. A 0 to 10 scale with 0, not likely and 10 highly likely, was used. Results: No significant difference emerged between the two groups for intended safe use of OTC analgesics. Intention to give someone acetaminophen when that person was taking antihypertensive medication was associated with intention to give Advil (r = .38, p < .001), and Aleve (r = .38, p < .001), and intention to give acetaminophen to someone who drinks three or more drinks of alcohol a day (r = .42, p < .001). Intention to give Aleve was associated with intention to give Advil when that person was taking antihypertensive medication (r = .65, p < .001). Conclusions and Implications: Reading the FDA pamphlet with additional information resulted in no significant increase in safe planned use of OTC analgesics. Results suggest patterns of unsafe indiscriminant use of OTC analgesics. Additional education about safe use of OTC analgesics via television public service announcements, or by health care practitioners, and pharmacists might provide a more effective way to teach the public to discriminate between safe and unsafe use of OTC analgesics.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:03Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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