New Ways of Looking at Critical Thinking in Graduate Students: Methodological and Theoretical Issues

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163143
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
New Ways of Looking at Critical Thinking in Graduate Students: Methodological and Theoretical Issues
Author(s):
McMullen, Maureen A.; McMullen, William F.
Author Details:
Maureen A. McMullen, DNSc, APRN, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts, USA, email: Maureen_McMullen@uml.edu; William F. McMullen, EdD, Boston University
Abstract:
Purpose: A great deal of research on critical thinking (CT) skills of undergraduate nursing students has been conducted. However, there has been no systematic evaluation of changes in CT that occur during graduate education. Prior research using conventional methods of analysis to investigate change in CT scores is based primarily on pre/post test assessments. Not surprisingly, few studies report significant change in students' CT skills, since pre/post assessments, using two panels of data, provide minimal information about change. In this study we use multiple panels of data and individual growth modeling to investigate change in CT skills during a graduate nurse practitioner program. Theoretical Framework: Skill Theory (Fischer) was used to explain changes in the CT skills of adult learners and suggest how they might be related to changes in contextual support during the clinical year. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A successive multiple cohort design was used to increase the sample size. Individual growth modeling was used to analyze the data, which consisted of repeated measures of CT using the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) on 83 graduate nursing students. Scores from the Evaluation, Analysis, and Inference subscales makeup the empirical growth record, which consisted of 4 panels of data. Results: Student's participation in the graduate education program had an impact on all of the CT skills examined. Change in evaluation skill levels was found to be directly related to program participation. A time-varying hierarchical relationship between the CT skills was found. Change in inference and analysis was found to be unrelated to time. Instead, differences with time in analysis and inferential skills were related to change over time in evaluation skill levels regardless of their time of occurrence. Conclusions and Implications: The findings are discussed in terms of their implications for the evaluation of educational outcomes for graduate student nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNew Ways of Looking at Critical Thinking in Graduate Students: Methodological and Theoretical Issuesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcMullen, Maureen A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcMullen, William F.en_US
dc.author.detailsMaureen A. McMullen, DNSc, APRN, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts, USA, email: Maureen_McMullen@uml.edu; William F. McMullen, EdD, Boston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163143-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: A great deal of research on critical thinking (CT) skills of undergraduate nursing students has been conducted. However, there has been no systematic evaluation of changes in CT that occur during graduate education. Prior research using conventional methods of analysis to investigate change in CT scores is based primarily on pre/post test assessments. Not surprisingly, few studies report significant change in students' CT skills, since pre/post assessments, using two panels of data, provide minimal information about change. In this study we use multiple panels of data and individual growth modeling to investigate change in CT skills during a graduate nurse practitioner program. Theoretical Framework: Skill Theory (Fischer) was used to explain changes in the CT skills of adult learners and suggest how they might be related to changes in contextual support during the clinical year. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A successive multiple cohort design was used to increase the sample size. Individual growth modeling was used to analyze the data, which consisted of repeated measures of CT using the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) on 83 graduate nursing students. Scores from the Evaluation, Analysis, and Inference subscales makeup the empirical growth record, which consisted of 4 panels of data. Results: Student's participation in the graduate education program had an impact on all of the CT skills examined. Change in evaluation skill levels was found to be directly related to program participation. A time-varying hierarchical relationship between the CT skills was found. Change in inference and analysis was found to be unrelated to time. Instead, differences with time in analysis and inferential skills were related to change over time in evaluation skill levels regardless of their time of occurrence. Conclusions and Implications: The findings are discussed in terms of their implications for the evaluation of educational outcomes for graduate student nurses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:06Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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