2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163145
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Correlation of Red Cell Volume with Hematocrit in VLBW Infants
Author(s):
Mercer, Judith S.; Erickson-Owens, Debra A.
Author Details:
Judith S. Mercer, DNSc, CNM, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA, email: jmercer@uri.edu; Debra A. Erickson-Owens
Abstract:
Purpose: This pilot study's aim was to measure red cell volume (RCV) using a flow cytometry method and to correlate RCV with hematocrit (Hct) in VLBW infants. Evidence suggests that the current practice of using the Hct to predict RCV often results in an inaccurate measure of available cells for oxygen delivery to the tissues. Yet, no other measures of RCV are readily available. A secondary aim was to examine correlation of RCV with clinical issues. Theoretical Framework: Physiologic theory suggests that fluid dynamics factors in VLBW infants may mask the red cell volume as measured indirectly by the Hct. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Twelve infants (24 - 29.6 weeks gestation, birth weight 830- 1,250 gm) enrolled in the study with parental permission and were transfused between 7 and 27 days of life. Before and after transfusion, 0.2 mL of blood was withdrawn. Using flow cytometry, the percentage of red blood cells (RBCs) containing fetal hemoglobin (HgF) were estimated by staining with a fluorescent antibody to the gamma chains of HgF after glutaraldehyde fixation and Triton permeabilization of the RBCs in the pre- and post-transfusion samples. The difference between HgF and HgA (adult hemoglobin) in the post-transfusion sample allowed for estimates of the pre-transfusion RCV. Prior validation of this method in preterm infants using the biotin method showed a correlation of 0.99. Hospital records were reviewed for clinical problems. Results: The mean RCV was 18.5 +/- 5.5, mL/kg. The pre-transfusion hematocrit was 30.5 + 4.2 %. The correlation between the pre-transfusion Hct and RCV was 0.7. A decrease in apneic events was noted in 83% of the infants after transfusion. Conclusions and Implications: Hematocrit appears to overestimate RCV by 30%. Apneic events may be related to low red cell volume. This flow cytometry technique may be a useful method for the estimate of RCV in VLBW infants.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorrelation of Red Cell Volume with Hematocrit in VLBW Infantsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMercer, Judith S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorErickson-Owens, Debra A.en_US
dc.author.detailsJudith S. Mercer, DNSc, CNM, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA, email: jmercer@uri.edu; Debra A. Erickson-Owensen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163145-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This pilot study's aim was to measure red cell volume (RCV) using a flow cytometry method and to correlate RCV with hematocrit (Hct) in VLBW infants. Evidence suggests that the current practice of using the Hct to predict RCV often results in an inaccurate measure of available cells for oxygen delivery to the tissues. Yet, no other measures of RCV are readily available. A secondary aim was to examine correlation of RCV with clinical issues. Theoretical Framework: Physiologic theory suggests that fluid dynamics factors in VLBW infants may mask the red cell volume as measured indirectly by the Hct. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Twelve infants (24 - 29.6 weeks gestation, birth weight 830- 1,250 gm) enrolled in the study with parental permission and were transfused between 7 and 27 days of life. Before and after transfusion, 0.2 mL of blood was withdrawn. Using flow cytometry, the percentage of red blood cells (RBCs) containing fetal hemoglobin (HgF) were estimated by staining with a fluorescent antibody to the gamma chains of HgF after glutaraldehyde fixation and Triton permeabilization of the RBCs in the pre- and post-transfusion samples. The difference between HgF and HgA (adult hemoglobin) in the post-transfusion sample allowed for estimates of the pre-transfusion RCV. Prior validation of this method in preterm infants using the biotin method showed a correlation of 0.99. Hospital records were reviewed for clinical problems. Results: The mean RCV was 18.5 +/- 5.5, mL/kg. The pre-transfusion hematocrit was 30.5 + 4.2 %. The correlation between the pre-transfusion Hct and RCV was 0.7. A decrease in apneic events was noted in 83% of the infants after transfusion. Conclusions and Implications: Hematocrit appears to overestimate RCV by 30%. Apneic events may be related to low red cell volume. This flow cytometry technique may be a useful method for the estimate of RCV in VLBW infants.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:08Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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