2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163154
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Listening to Nurses Voices: Inconsistent Professional Breastfeeding Support
Author(s):
Nelson, Antonia M.; Clabo, Laurie M. Lauzon
Author Details:
Antonia Nelson, Ph.D., RNC, IBCLC, Associate Professor, Saint Anselm College Department of Nursing, Manchester, New Hampshire, USA, email: anelson@anselm.edu; Laurie M. Lauzon Clabo, PhD, RN, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth
Abstract:
Purpose: To describe the meaning and significance of the essential elements of inconsistent professional breastfeeding support as experienced by maternal-newborn nurses. Background: Although professional breastfeeding support has been found to have a beneficial effect on breastfeeding (Sikorski et al., 2003), professional breastfeeding support that is inconsistent has a negative impact on maternal breastfeeding efforts (Dykes et al., 2003; Hailes et al.,2000; Hong et al., 2003; Humenick et al., 1998; Rajan, 1993; Simmons, 2002). Absent from the literature is research documenting the experience of nurses related to this persistent phenomenon. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Design: A qualitative, phenomenological method as described by Colaizzi (1973, 1978). Participants/ Setting: 12 non-IBCLC maternal-newborn nurses working in the hospital setting. Data Collection: Audio-taped interviews were conducted with participants. Tapes were transcribed to allow for data analysis. Analytic Approach: Clusters of essential themes were identified and an "exhaustive description" and statement of the "fundamental structure" of the phenomenon written (Colaizzi, 1973, 1978). Results: Seven thematic clusters were identified: 1) Inconsistencies exist but things are changing, 1) There is no escaping personal experience, 3) What works for one does not work for all, 4) Time impacts recommendations, 5) Nurses have a privileged vantage point, 6) "My job," what it is and what it is not, and &) After all, breastfeeding is a maternal "choice." When nurses provided professional breastfeeding support that was inconsistent it was a professional judgment, made from a privileged vantage point. Further, it was a judgment that had subjectively justifiable ethical implications and was made in response to an assessment of patient need in the present moment. Conclusions and Implications: Findings suggest a need to communicate with mothers antenatally that learning to breastfeed is a process often requiring trial and error and adaptation. In addition increased opportunities for dialogue between all professionals who support breastfeeding is warranted to increase understanding, address concerns, and increase collaboration.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleListening to Nurses Voices: Inconsistent Professional Breastfeeding Supporten_GB
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Antonia M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClabo, Laurie M. Lauzonen_US
dc.author.detailsAntonia Nelson, Ph.D., RNC, IBCLC, Associate Professor, Saint Anselm College Department of Nursing, Manchester, New Hampshire, USA, email: anelson@anselm.edu; Laurie M. Lauzon Clabo, PhD, RN, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouthen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163154-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To describe the meaning and significance of the essential elements of inconsistent professional breastfeeding support as experienced by maternal-newborn nurses. Background: Although professional breastfeeding support has been found to have a beneficial effect on breastfeeding (Sikorski et al., 2003), professional breastfeeding support that is inconsistent has a negative impact on maternal breastfeeding efforts (Dykes et al., 2003; Hailes et al.,2000; Hong et al., 2003; Humenick et al., 1998; Rajan, 1993; Simmons, 2002). Absent from the literature is research documenting the experience of nurses related to this persistent phenomenon. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Design: A qualitative, phenomenological method as described by Colaizzi (1973, 1978). Participants/ Setting: 12 non-IBCLC maternal-newborn nurses working in the hospital setting. Data Collection: Audio-taped interviews were conducted with participants. Tapes were transcribed to allow for data analysis. Analytic Approach: Clusters of essential themes were identified and an "exhaustive description" and statement of the "fundamental structure" of the phenomenon written (Colaizzi, 1973, 1978). Results: Seven thematic clusters were identified: 1) Inconsistencies exist but things are changing, 1) There is no escaping personal experience, 3) What works for one does not work for all, 4) Time impacts recommendations, 5) Nurses have a privileged vantage point, 6) "My job," what it is and what it is not, and &) After all, breastfeeding is a maternal "choice." When nurses provided professional breastfeeding support that was inconsistent it was a professional judgment, made from a privileged vantage point. Further, it was a judgment that had subjectively justifiable ethical implications and was made in response to an assessment of patient need in the present moment. Conclusions and Implications: Findings suggest a need to communicate with mothers antenatally that learning to breastfeed is a process often requiring trial and error and adaptation. In addition increased opportunities for dialogue between all professionals who support breastfeeding is warranted to increase understanding, address concerns, and increase collaboration.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:19Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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