2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163162
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Cluttered Home: Multiple Meanings for Frail Elderly
Author(s):
Plowfield, Lisa Ann; Hayes, Evelyn R.; Raymond, Jean E.; Greggo, Elaine M.
Author Details:
Lisa Ann Plowfield, PhD, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, USA, email: plow@udel.edu; Evelyn R. Hayes; Jean E. Raymond; Elaine M. Greggo
Abstract:
Purpose: One's home and the organization of one's household may indicate environmental, physical, or psychosocial difficulties for frail elders. The primary aims of this study were to determine the incidence of cluttered living space in community dwelling frail elderly families and examine comprehensively individual and family issues related to clutter in a frail elder's immediate living environment. Theoretical Framework: The Omaha System provided the framework for analyzing and documenting comprehensive needs. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A case study analysis approach was used to examine the meaning of clutter for those frail elders (n=148) who exhibited this environmental need. Clinician visits, chart documentation, frail elders, and family informants were the sources of data. The majority of frail elders resided in their own home or apartment; in one case the frail elder resided in a skilled nursing facility. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample characteristics. Percentages provided the incidence of need that existed within this sample of frail elders. Chart reviews and thematic analysis were used to identify meanings assigned to cluttered living space. Results: Within the dataset, 33% of frail elders had difficulties within their residence. Of those exhibiting a residential need, cluttered living space was the most prevalent difficulty leading to hazardous living conditions; 32.7% of frail elders with a residential need exhibited clutter in one's immediate surroundings. Preliminary findings indicated that clutter had multiple meanings for frail elders. Conclusions and Implications: The meanings of clutter included hoarding, a method of control over one's environment, inappropriate attachments to non-human entities, and memories of insufficiencies during the depression years. Additional meanings included inability to organize, lack of physical capabilities, and cognitive decline resulting in inattentiveness to clutter within one's environment.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Cluttered Home: Multiple Meanings for Frail Elderlyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPlowfield, Lisa Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Evelyn R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRaymond, Jean E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGreggo, Elaine M.en_US
dc.author.detailsLisa Ann Plowfield, PhD, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, USA, email: plow@udel.edu; Evelyn R. Hayes; Jean E. Raymond; Elaine M. Greggoen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163162-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: One's home and the organization of one's household may indicate environmental, physical, or psychosocial difficulties for frail elders. The primary aims of this study were to determine the incidence of cluttered living space in community dwelling frail elderly families and examine comprehensively individual and family issues related to clutter in a frail elder's immediate living environment. Theoretical Framework: The Omaha System provided the framework for analyzing and documenting comprehensive needs. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A case study analysis approach was used to examine the meaning of clutter for those frail elders (n=148) who exhibited this environmental need. Clinician visits, chart documentation, frail elders, and family informants were the sources of data. The majority of frail elders resided in their own home or apartment; in one case the frail elder resided in a skilled nursing facility. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample characteristics. Percentages provided the incidence of need that existed within this sample of frail elders. Chart reviews and thematic analysis were used to identify meanings assigned to cluttered living space. Results: Within the dataset, 33% of frail elders had difficulties within their residence. Of those exhibiting a residential need, cluttered living space was the most prevalent difficulty leading to hazardous living conditions; 32.7% of frail elders with a residential need exhibited clutter in one's immediate surroundings. Preliminary findings indicated that clutter had multiple meanings for frail elders. Conclusions and Implications: The meanings of clutter included hoarding, a method of control over one's environment, inappropriate attachments to non-human entities, and memories of insufficiencies during the depression years. Additional meanings included inability to organize, lack of physical capabilities, and cognitive decline resulting in inattentiveness to clutter within one's environment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:28Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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