2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163165
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How Does Black Cohosh Relieve Hot Flashes? Mechanistic Studies
Author(s):
Reame, Nancy E.; Lukacz, Jane; Smith, Yolanda; Zubieta, Jon-Kar
Author Details:
Nancy E. Reame, MSN, PhD, FAAN, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA, email: nr2188@columbia.edu; Jane Lukacs, MSN, PhD; Yolanda Smith; Jon-Kar Zubieta, University of Michigan
Abstract:
Purpose: To begin to characterize the activity of black cohosh (BC) - a commonly used herbal supplement- as a neuroactive agent for the treatment of hot flashes in postmenopausal women . Theoretical Framework: Principles of Reproductive neuroendocrinology (Reame, 2007). Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): To pilot test whether black cohosh (BC)- acts as an estrogen mimic on the hypothalamus via the endogenous opioid system. Seven postmenopausal women with menopausal complaints were studied in the University Hospital General Clinical Research Center before and after an unblinded 12 wk trial with black cohosh (Remifemin: GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Health Care, Pittsburgh, PA; 20mg bid). At baseline, blood was sampled q10 min across a 16 hr wake-sleep interval (3pm-7am) to confirm the low estrogen and elevated pulse profile of LH (luteinizing hormone) in the opioid-free condition of post menopause. Sleep efficiency was monitored. No objective hot flash monitoring was conducted in this unblinded protocol. At the end of BC trx, subjects underwent two overnight LH pulse studies one week apart to compare the effects of normal saline infusion (placebo condition) vs. naloxone (opioid antagonist) Results: There was no effect on sleep efficiency or basal FSH, estradiol, or LH secretion. However, in response to a naloxone challenge, LH pulse frequency was slowed by 30-50% and interpulse interval was lengthened on average by 40 min in 5 of 6 subjects, creating a strong trend for significant change (p = 0.56) in this small data set. Conclusions and Implications: Using a well-accepted neuroendocrine challenge, we have demonstrated for the first time in humans, a pharmacologic action of a standard dose of black cohosh on the hypothalamus. The unexpected suppression of LH pulsatility with naloxone is not typical of an estrogen -mediated event, and suggests that other sex steroid independent neuromechanisms may be involved.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow Does Black Cohosh Relieve Hot Flashes? Mechanistic Studiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReame, Nancy E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLukacz, Janeen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Yolandaen_US
dc.contributor.authorZubieta, Jon-Karen_US
dc.author.detailsNancy E. Reame, MSN, PhD, FAAN, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA, email: nr2188@columbia.edu; Jane Lukacs, MSN, PhD; Yolanda Smith; Jon-Kar Zubieta, University of Michiganen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163165-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To begin to characterize the activity of black cohosh (BC) - a commonly used herbal supplement- as a neuroactive agent for the treatment of hot flashes in postmenopausal women . Theoretical Framework: Principles of Reproductive neuroendocrinology (Reame, 2007). Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): To pilot test whether black cohosh (BC)- acts as an estrogen mimic on the hypothalamus via the endogenous opioid system. Seven postmenopausal women with menopausal complaints were studied in the University Hospital General Clinical Research Center before and after an unblinded 12 wk trial with black cohosh (Remifemin: GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Health Care, Pittsburgh, PA; 20mg bid). At baseline, blood was sampled q10 min across a 16 hr wake-sleep interval (3pm-7am) to confirm the low estrogen and elevated pulse profile of LH (luteinizing hormone) in the opioid-free condition of post menopause. Sleep efficiency was monitored. No objective hot flash monitoring was conducted in this unblinded protocol. At the end of BC trx, subjects underwent two overnight LH pulse studies one week apart to compare the effects of normal saline infusion (placebo condition) vs. naloxone (opioid antagonist) Results: There was no effect on sleep efficiency or basal FSH, estradiol, or LH secretion. However, in response to a naloxone challenge, LH pulse frequency was slowed by 30-50% and interpulse interval was lengthened on average by 40 min in 5 of 6 subjects, creating a strong trend for significant change (p = 0.56) in this small data set. Conclusions and Implications: Using a well-accepted neuroendocrine challenge, we have demonstrated for the first time in humans, a pharmacologic action of a standard dose of black cohosh on the hypothalamus. The unexpected suppression of LH pulsatility with naloxone is not typical of an estrogen -mediated event, and suggests that other sex steroid independent neuromechanisms may be involved.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:32Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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