Gender Differences in Sleep, Symptoms and Functional Performance in Patients with Stable Heart Failure

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163166
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gender Differences in Sleep, Symptoms and Functional Performance in Patients with Stable Heart Failure
Author(s):
Redeker, Nancy S.; Campbell, Della; Qureshi, Rubab
Author Details:
Nancy Redeker, Professor, Yale University, West Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: nancy.redeker@yale.edu; Della Campbell PhD(c), APRN-C; Rubab Qureshi, PhD�
Abstract:
Purpose: To examine: 1) gender differences in sleep disturbance, fatigue, depression, and functional performance; and 2) the extent to which gender moderates the relationships between sleep disturbance and functional performance in people who have stable heart failure (HF). Theoretical Framework: Fatigue, depression, and sleep disturbance, appear to contribute to functional performance in people with HF. However, there has been little multivariate study of the extent to which gender may influence these variables or the relationships among them. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): We used a cross-sectional design. The sample included 133 male (n = 93) and female (n = 40) stable class II-IV HF patients (ejection fraction M = 30, SD = 14.44) recruited from specialized HF management programs. Participants completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Global Fatigue, Centers for the Epidemiological Studies of Depression, Epworth Sleepiness Scales, the MOS-SF36, and the Six Minute Walk test (6 MWT). Results: There were no statistically significant gender-related differences in NY class, ejection fraction, comorbidity, or age. Women had poorer self-reported physical function (p = .02), 6MWT (p = .04), and more depression (p = .008) and fatigue (p < .001) than men. There were no statistically significant gender differences in sleep disturbance, SF36 Mental Health, or daytime sleepiness. After controlling for the effects of age, NY class, and comorbidity, sleep disturbance (p = .001) and gender had independent effects on physical function (p = .06). There was a gender X sleep disturbance interaction effect on physical function (p = .07). Sleep disturbance and gender had statistically significant independent effects on 6MWT and fatigue. Conclusions and Implications: Women with HF are at higher risk for functional performance decrements, fatigue, and depression than men. Sleep disturbance increases the likelihood of poor self-reported and objective physical function for men and women. However, sleep disturbance appears to have a greater impact on women's self-reported function.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGender Differences in Sleep, Symptoms and Functional Performance in Patients with Stable Heart Failureen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRedeker, Nancy S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Dellaen_US
dc.contributor.authorQureshi, Rubaben_US
dc.author.detailsNancy Redeker, Professor, Yale University, West Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: nancy.redeker@yale.edu; Della Campbell PhD(c), APRN-C; Rubab Qureshi, PhD�en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163166-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To examine: 1) gender differences in sleep disturbance, fatigue, depression, and functional performance; and 2) the extent to which gender moderates the relationships between sleep disturbance and functional performance in people who have stable heart failure (HF). Theoretical Framework: Fatigue, depression, and sleep disturbance, appear to contribute to functional performance in people with HF. However, there has been little multivariate study of the extent to which gender may influence these variables or the relationships among them. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): We used a cross-sectional design. The sample included 133 male (n = 93) and female (n = 40) stable class II-IV HF patients (ejection fraction M = 30, SD = 14.44) recruited from specialized HF management programs. Participants completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Global Fatigue, Centers for the Epidemiological Studies of Depression, Epworth Sleepiness Scales, the MOS-SF36, and the Six Minute Walk test (6 MWT). Results: There were no statistically significant gender-related differences in NY class, ejection fraction, comorbidity, or age. Women had poorer self-reported physical function (p = .02), 6MWT (p = .04), and more depression (p = .008) and fatigue (p < .001) than men. There were no statistically significant gender differences in sleep disturbance, SF36 Mental Health, or daytime sleepiness. After controlling for the effects of age, NY class, and comorbidity, sleep disturbance (p = .001) and gender had independent effects on physical function (p = .06). There was a gender X sleep disturbance interaction effect on physical function (p = .07). Sleep disturbance and gender had statistically significant independent effects on 6MWT and fatigue. Conclusions and Implications: Women with HF are at higher risk for functional performance decrements, fatigue, and depression than men. Sleep disturbance increases the likelihood of poor self-reported and objective physical function for men and women. However, sleep disturbance appears to have a greater impact on women's self-reported function.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:33Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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