2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163167
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions of Psychosocial Factors among Adults Using Insulin Pump Technology
Author(s):
Ritholz, Marilyn; Wolpert, Howard; Weinger, Katie; Smaldone, Arlene; Lee, Jarim; Atakov-Castillo, Astrid
Author Details:
Marilyn Ritholz, PhD, Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: marilyn.ritholz@joslin.harvard.edu; Howard Wolpert, MD; Katie Weinger EdD, RN; Arlene Smaldone, DNSc, CPNP, CDE, Columbia University; Jarim Lee, BA; Astrid Atakov-Castillo, BA
Abstract:
Purpose: To identify psychosocial issues related to diabetes, approaches to self-care, self-perceptions, and social interactions among type 1 diabetes insulin pump users. Background: Improvements in both insulin pump technology and blood glucose meters have made the insulin pump a popular mode of treatment to help meet the challenge of tighter blood glucose control. However, few studies have examined how the insulin pump affects the lives of those who wear it, particularly among adults. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Adult insulin pump users participated in focus groups loosely based on A1c level. Transcripts were coded into themes by 5 reviewers and analyzed using NVivo2 qualitative software. Results: Thirty adults with long-term diabetes participated in 5 focus groups: good (HbA1c=6.8 +/- 0.4%), fair (HbA1c=7.80 +/- 0.3%), and poor (HbA1c=9.1+/- 0.5%) control. Three major themes were identified: Impact on Diabetes Self-Care; Emotional Reactions to Insulin Pump; and Body Image and Social Acceptance. Participants who described the pump as a tool to meet glycemic goals also described a more active approach to diabetes and were in the good glycemic control group. While those who discussed the pump as a panacea described more passive self-care and had poorer glycemic control. Good control groups reported that starting the insulin pump recalled the trauma of their diabetes diagnosis, while the poor control groups did not. Women were more concerned than men about body image and social acceptance with pump use. Conclusions and Implications: Active participation in self-care, realistic expectations of pump use, and recall of diabetes diagnosis were associated with better glycemic control. Interventions to improve diabetes management with pump use should include evaluation and discussion of active versus passive approaches to self-care, recall of diabetes diagnosis, expectations of the pump, and pump-related self-consciousness and body image concerns. The roles of these variables in optimal diabetes management warrant further investigation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions of Psychosocial Factors among Adults Using Insulin Pump Technologyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRitholz, Marilynen_US
dc.contributor.authorWolpert, Howarden_US
dc.contributor.authorWeinger, Katieen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmaldone, Arleneen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Jarimen_US
dc.contributor.authorAtakov-Castillo, Astriden_US
dc.author.detailsMarilyn Ritholz, PhD, Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: marilyn.ritholz@joslin.harvard.edu; Howard Wolpert, MD; Katie Weinger EdD, RN; Arlene Smaldone, DNSc, CPNP, CDE, Columbia University; Jarim Lee, BA; Astrid Atakov-Castillo, BAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163167-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To identify psychosocial issues related to diabetes, approaches to self-care, self-perceptions, and social interactions among type 1 diabetes insulin pump users. Background: Improvements in both insulin pump technology and blood glucose meters have made the insulin pump a popular mode of treatment to help meet the challenge of tighter blood glucose control. However, few studies have examined how the insulin pump affects the lives of those who wear it, particularly among adults. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Adult insulin pump users participated in focus groups loosely based on A1c level. Transcripts were coded into themes by 5 reviewers and analyzed using NVivo2 qualitative software. Results: Thirty adults with long-term diabetes participated in 5 focus groups: good (HbA1c=6.8 +/- 0.4%), fair (HbA1c=7.80 +/- 0.3%), and poor (HbA1c=9.1+/- 0.5%) control. Three major themes were identified: Impact on Diabetes Self-Care; Emotional Reactions to Insulin Pump; and Body Image and Social Acceptance. Participants who described the pump as a tool to meet glycemic goals also described a more active approach to diabetes and were in the good glycemic control group. While those who discussed the pump as a panacea described more passive self-care and had poorer glycemic control. Good control groups reported that starting the insulin pump recalled the trauma of their diabetes diagnosis, while the poor control groups did not. Women were more concerned than men about body image and social acceptance with pump use. Conclusions and Implications: Active participation in self-care, realistic expectations of pump use, and recall of diabetes diagnosis were associated with better glycemic control. Interventions to improve diabetes management with pump use should include evaluation and discussion of active versus passive approaches to self-care, recall of diabetes diagnosis, expectations of the pump, and pump-related self-consciousness and body image concerns. The roles of these variables in optimal diabetes management warrant further investigation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:34Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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