The Relationship between Multidisciplinary Rounds and Patient and Provider Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163169
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship between Multidisciplinary Rounds and Patient and Provider Outcomes
Author(s):
Roche, Joan; Tehan, Tara M.; Calcasola, Stephanie L.
Author Details:
Joan Roche, PhD, RN, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA, email: joan.roche@bhs.org; Tara M. Tehan, RN, MSN, MBA; Stephanie L. Calcasola, MSN, RN, BC, Baystate Medical Center
Abstract:
Purpose: Increasing multidisciplinary collaboration can create a healthier environment for healthcare workers, and a safer hospital for patients. The Institute of Medicine proposed several changes to transform the hospital work environment to protect patient safety, including structured opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration. The purpose of this study is to compare patient and provider outcomes before and after the initiation of weekly multidisciplinary rounds on a Respiratory Intermediate Care Unit (RICP) in a large medical center. Theoretical Framework: This study is based on Donabedian's theoretical framework of Structure Process Outcomes. The research team recognized that there were informal collaboration processes in place on this intermediate nursing unit with a population of complex respiratory patients. They hypothesized that a structure to facilitate consistent, regularly scheduled multidisciplinary dialogue on each patient would be associated with improved patient outcomes, and increased nurse and MD satisfaction with the decision making. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This study is a pre and post test design. The leadership staff nurses initiated new weekly formal interdisciplinary rounds on all patients on the RICP. The caregiver outcomes (perceptions of collaboration and the satisfaction with collaboration) were measured with a collaboration questionnaire (Baggs, 1994) before the initiation of the rounds and six months after the onset. The patient length of stay (LOS), number of patient complaints and multidisciplinary consults were already collected each month. These measures will be compared for the same dates as the caregiver outcomes, using the appropriate statistical tests. The study was approved by the IRB. Results: The multidisciplinary rounds were developed over a three month planning period. The initial data was collected and the actual rounds began in April. There has been strong participation of all of the disciplines. The post test data will be measured and results will be presented at the conference. Conclusions and Implications: The conclusions and implications will be presented at the conference.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship between Multidisciplinary Rounds and Patient and Provider Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoche, Joanen_US
dc.contributor.authorTehan, Tara M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCalcasola, Stephanie L.en_US
dc.author.detailsJoan Roche, PhD, RN, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA, email: joan.roche@bhs.org; Tara M. Tehan, RN, MSN, MBA; Stephanie L. Calcasola, MSN, RN, BC, Baystate Medical Centeren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163169-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Increasing multidisciplinary collaboration can create a healthier environment for healthcare workers, and a safer hospital for patients. The Institute of Medicine proposed several changes to transform the hospital work environment to protect patient safety, including structured opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration. The purpose of this study is to compare patient and provider outcomes before and after the initiation of weekly multidisciplinary rounds on a Respiratory Intermediate Care Unit (RICP) in a large medical center. Theoretical Framework: This study is based on Donabedian's theoretical framework of Structure Process Outcomes. The research team recognized that there were informal collaboration processes in place on this intermediate nursing unit with a population of complex respiratory patients. They hypothesized that a structure to facilitate consistent, regularly scheduled multidisciplinary dialogue on each patient would be associated with improved patient outcomes, and increased nurse and MD satisfaction with the decision making. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This study is a pre and post test design. The leadership staff nurses initiated new weekly formal interdisciplinary rounds on all patients on the RICP. The caregiver outcomes (perceptions of collaboration and the satisfaction with collaboration) were measured with a collaboration questionnaire (Baggs, 1994) before the initiation of the rounds and six months after the onset. The patient length of stay (LOS), number of patient complaints and multidisciplinary consults were already collected each month. These measures will be compared for the same dates as the caregiver outcomes, using the appropriate statistical tests. The study was approved by the IRB. Results: The multidisciplinary rounds were developed over a three month planning period. The initial data was collected and the actual rounds began in April. There has been strong participation of all of the disciplines. The post test data will be measured and results will be presented at the conference. Conclusions and Implications: The conclusions and implications will be presented at the conference.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:36Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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