2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163170
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patients recovery over time after day surgery
Author(s):
Rosen, Helena I.
Author Details:
Helena I. Rosen, University of Skovde, Skovde, Sweden, email: helena.rosen@his.se
Abstract:
Purpose: The frequency of day surgery continues to increase internationally. However, knowledge of the pain experiences of patients beyond the first 24 to 72 hours postoperatively remains almost nonexistent. The aim of this study is to identify the frequency and intensity of pain, it's impact on daily life and the effectiveness of pain treatments over a 3 month period. Theoretical Framework: The revised Symptom Management Model (Dodd et al, 2001) serves as the conceptual framework for this study. This model examines three dimensions of the patient's experience and management of symptoms. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A descriptive research design was used to survey 300 individuals undergoing day surgery in a 450 community hospital in Sweden. The Short Form Brief Pain Inventory was used to measure (on a numerical scale from 0 to 10) the frequency and intensity of pain, the extent to which pain interferes with general activity, mood, walking ability, normal work, relations with other people, sleep, enjoyment of life and the relief obtained from pain treatment, 48 hours, 14 days, and 3 months after surgery. Descriptive statistics will be used for the analysis. Results: A pilot study was conducted with 10 postoperative patients. Forty-eight hours after surgery, the mean worst pain during the last 24 hour period was reported at 5.5 (Standard Deviation of 1.87). Seven days after surgery, the mean worst pain was reported at 4.0 (Standard Deviation 4.45). Three months after surgery no pain was reported in the individuals in this sample. In general, pain interfered with daily living at high level at 48 hours, at moderate levels at 7 days. Conclusions and Implications: The study is expected to generate an initial description of patients' experiences with pain after day surgery in order to help identify the kind, range and timing of nursing interventions that may be needed for managing pain and its impact in this population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatients recovery over time after day surgeryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRosen, Helena I.en_US
dc.author.detailsHelena I. Rosen, University of Skovde, Skovde, Sweden, email: helena.rosen@his.seen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163170-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The frequency of day surgery continues to increase internationally. However, knowledge of the pain experiences of patients beyond the first 24 to 72 hours postoperatively remains almost nonexistent. The aim of this study is to identify the frequency and intensity of pain, it's impact on daily life and the effectiveness of pain treatments over a 3 month period. Theoretical Framework: The revised Symptom Management Model (Dodd et al, 2001) serves as the conceptual framework for this study. This model examines three dimensions of the patient's experience and management of symptoms. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A descriptive research design was used to survey 300 individuals undergoing day surgery in a 450 community hospital in Sweden. The Short Form Brief Pain Inventory was used to measure (on a numerical scale from 0 to 10) the frequency and intensity of pain, the extent to which pain interferes with general activity, mood, walking ability, normal work, relations with other people, sleep, enjoyment of life and the relief obtained from pain treatment, 48 hours, 14 days, and 3 months after surgery. Descriptive statistics will be used for the analysis. Results: A pilot study was conducted with 10 postoperative patients. Forty-eight hours after surgery, the mean worst pain during the last 24 hour period was reported at 5.5 (Standard Deviation of 1.87). Seven days after surgery, the mean worst pain was reported at 4.0 (Standard Deviation 4.45). Three months after surgery no pain was reported in the individuals in this sample. In general, pain interfered with daily living at high level at 48 hours, at moderate levels at 7 days. Conclusions and Implications: The study is expected to generate an initial description of patients' experiences with pain after day surgery in order to help identify the kind, range and timing of nursing interventions that may be needed for managing pain and its impact in this population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:38Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.