2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163176
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Rural Community Partnership to Promote Health and Fitness by Age 5
Author(s):
Sellers, Kathleen F.; Dennison, Barbara A.; Sellers, Claire; Baker, Ida; Sherwood, Nancy; Burdick, Patrick; Russo, Theresa
Author Details:
Kathleen F. Sellers, PhD, State University of New York Institute of Technology, Utica, New York, USA, email: sellerk@sunyit.edu; Barbara A. Dennison, MD; Claire Sellers, BA; Ida Baker, MA; Nancy Sherwood, PhD; Patrick Burdick, MA, Bassett Healthcare; Theresa Russo, PhD, State University of New York at Oneonta
Abstract:
Purpose: Young children have the right to live in a community environment that promotes health and fitness. A Rural Community Partnership to Promote Health and Fitness by Age 5 is a population-based, multi-pronged intervention with a primary aim to decrease obesity among young preschool-age children. Theoretical Framework: Bronfenbrenner's (1986) Ecological Theory and Roger's Diffusion of Innovation guided this study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Using a repeated cross-sectional, experimental design, focus groups and community participatory research methods, four community partners (early childhood educators, the healthcare and business communities, and parents), were targeted to make lifestyle changes: (1) increasing consumption of fruit, vegetables, and low-fat milk, (2) increasing physical activity, and (3) decreasing television and video watching, in the environment where young children dwell; thereby lowering the BMI of preschoolers in the intervention over control group. The target population was preschool children aged 2-5 years living in two rural school districts in upstate New York 60 miles apart. Intervention vs. control groups were compared using: Student t-tests, Chi-square, Mantel Haenszel X2 (nominal variables); Mantel Haenszel test (rank ordered variables); ANOVA, Rate Difference test for independent proportions (1-sided p-value) (change over time). Results: (1) Focus groups revealed that early childhood educators recognized their current role of controlling and influencing the environment thus developing healthy habits in young preschool-age children. (2) Nurses and providers in the intervention vs. control participating healthcare practices significantly increased BMI screening (p< 0.001) and counseling of parents of overweight vs. non-overweight children regarding diet/nutrition (p=0.02) and activity (0.05). (3) Children in the intervention community reported significantly fewer hours per week viewing television than in the control group (13.6 vs.18.9 hours/week, respectively, p< 0.001). (4) Trends towards significance were found in lowering BMI of preschool-age children in the intervention over control community. Conclusions and Implications: Multi-dimensional, community based interventions are needed to create awareness and develop successful strategies to stem the epidemic of childhood obesity.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Rural Community Partnership to Promote Health and Fitness by Age 5en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSellers, Kathleen F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDennison, Barbara A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSellers, Claireen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Idaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSherwood, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurdick, Patricken_US
dc.contributor.authorRusso, Theresaen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen F. Sellers, PhD, State University of New York Institute of Technology, Utica, New York, USA, email: sellerk@sunyit.edu; Barbara A. Dennison, MD; Claire Sellers, BA; Ida Baker, MA; Nancy Sherwood, PhD; Patrick Burdick, MA, Bassett Healthcare; Theresa Russo, PhD, State University of New York at Oneontaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163176-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Young children have the right to live in a community environment that promotes health and fitness. A Rural Community Partnership to Promote Health and Fitness by Age 5 is a population-based, multi-pronged intervention with a primary aim to decrease obesity among young preschool-age children. Theoretical Framework: Bronfenbrenner's (1986) Ecological Theory and Roger's Diffusion of Innovation guided this study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Using a repeated cross-sectional, experimental design, focus groups and community participatory research methods, four community partners (early childhood educators, the healthcare and business communities, and parents), were targeted to make lifestyle changes: (1) increasing consumption of fruit, vegetables, and low-fat milk, (2) increasing physical activity, and (3) decreasing television and video watching, in the environment where young children dwell; thereby lowering the BMI of preschoolers in the intervention over control group. The target population was preschool children aged 2-5 years living in two rural school districts in upstate New York 60 miles apart. Intervention vs. control groups were compared using: Student t-tests, Chi-square, Mantel Haenszel X2 (nominal variables); Mantel Haenszel test (rank ordered variables); ANOVA, Rate Difference test for independent proportions (1-sided p-value) (change over time). Results: (1) Focus groups revealed that early childhood educators recognized their current role of controlling and influencing the environment thus developing healthy habits in young preschool-age children. (2) Nurses and providers in the intervention vs. control participating healthcare practices significantly increased BMI screening (p< 0.001) and counseling of parents of overweight vs. non-overweight children regarding diet/nutrition (p=0.02) and activity (0.05). (3) Children in the intervention community reported significantly fewer hours per week viewing television than in the control group (13.6 vs.18.9 hours/week, respectively, p< 0.001). (4) Trends towards significance were found in lowering BMI of preschool-age children in the intervention over control community. Conclusions and Implications: Multi-dimensional, community based interventions are needed to create awareness and develop successful strategies to stem the epidemic of childhood obesity.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:45Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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