Avoidance as a primary pain management strategy in post coronary artery bypass graft patients in the first 12 weeks after surgery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163177
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Avoidance as a primary pain management strategy in post coronary artery bypass graft patients in the first 12 weeks after surgery
Author(s):
Sethares, Kristen; Chin, Elizabeth F.; Costa, Inge
Author Details:
Kristen Sethares, PhD, RN, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, Massachusetts, USA, email: ksethares@umassd.edu; Elizabeth F. Chin, MS, RN, ANP-c; Inge Costa
Abstract:
Purpose: Pain is the most frequently reported problem for patients recovering from coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Pain can prevent participation in activities necessary for recovery and lead to complications in the post-operative period. Before nursing interventions can be developed to control post-operative pain at home, a greater understanding of the patient's pain experience is needed. The purpose of this study is to determine patterns of pain intensity and interference with daily activities in post CABG patients and identify the pain management strategies patients employ. Theoretical Framework: The Gate Control Theory provided the theoretical underpinnings for this study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This exploratory descriptive study evaluated pain levels in 54 post-CABG patients for12 weeks after surgery. Patients were recruited from the Cardiovascular Surgical Stepdown unit of a local community hospital. Data on pain intensity, interference with activities, and pain management strategies was collected by weekly telephone interview. The number and type of pain management strategies reported at each time point were summarized and compared against pain intensity data gathered using the Brief Pain Inventory. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to determine changes in pain intensity. Results: Pain intensity significantly decreased each week for the first 5 weeks after surgery, with the highest pain intensity during hospitalization and the fifth week after surgery. Avoidance and activity modification, beyond the activity restriction prescribed by their surgeon, were the most common pain management strategies reported at weeks 2-5. It is noteworthy that patients also reported 'running out of pain medication' in weeks 2-3. Conclusions and Implications: Patients use activity avoidance as a primary pain management technique. Unavailability of medications was also reported. Clinicians need to advise patients about alternative pain management strategies, including non-narcotic analgesics. Activity restrictions beyond those prescribed by the physician may increase recovery time and/or complication rates, and warrants further investigation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAvoidance as a primary pain management strategy in post coronary artery bypass graft patients in the first 12 weeks after surgeryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSethares, Kristenen_US
dc.contributor.authorChin, Elizabeth F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCosta, Ingeen_US
dc.author.detailsKristen Sethares, PhD, RN, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, Massachusetts, USA, email: ksethares@umassd.edu; Elizabeth F. Chin, MS, RN, ANP-c; Inge Costaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163177-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Pain is the most frequently reported problem for patients recovering from coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Pain can prevent participation in activities necessary for recovery and lead to complications in the post-operative period. Before nursing interventions can be developed to control post-operative pain at home, a greater understanding of the patient's pain experience is needed. The purpose of this study is to determine patterns of pain intensity and interference with daily activities in post CABG patients and identify the pain management strategies patients employ. Theoretical Framework: The Gate Control Theory provided the theoretical underpinnings for this study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This exploratory descriptive study evaluated pain levels in 54 post-CABG patients for12 weeks after surgery. Patients were recruited from the Cardiovascular Surgical Stepdown unit of a local community hospital. Data on pain intensity, interference with activities, and pain management strategies was collected by weekly telephone interview. The number and type of pain management strategies reported at each time point were summarized and compared against pain intensity data gathered using the Brief Pain Inventory. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to determine changes in pain intensity. Results: Pain intensity significantly decreased each week for the first 5 weeks after surgery, with the highest pain intensity during hospitalization and the fifth week after surgery. Avoidance and activity modification, beyond the activity restriction prescribed by their surgeon, were the most common pain management strategies reported at weeks 2-5. It is noteworthy that patients also reported 'running out of pain medication' in weeks 2-3. Conclusions and Implications: Patients use activity avoidance as a primary pain management technique. Unavailability of medications was also reported. Clinicians need to advise patients about alternative pain management strategies, including non-narcotic analgesics. Activity restrictions beyond those prescribed by the physician may increase recovery time and/or complication rates, and warrants further investigation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:46Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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