School-Aged Children's Perceptions of Their Postoperative Experience After Spinal Fusion with Instrumentation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163178
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
School-Aged Children's Perceptions of Their Postoperative Experience After Spinal Fusion with Instrumentation
Author(s):
Shannon, Elizabeth G.; Duffy, Mary; Arnstein, Paul; Mott, Sandra
Author Details:
Elizabeth G. Shannon, RN, PhD(c), Children's Hospital Boston and Boston College, Dover, Massachusetts, USA, email: elizabeth.shannon@childrens.harvard.edu; Mary Duffy, PhD, RN, FAAN; Paul Arnstein, PhD, RNCS, FNP-C; Sandra Mott, PhD, RNC
Abstract:
Purpose: This study had a two-fold purpose: (1) to describe how school-aged children perceived their experience, and responded to acute postoperative pain following spinal surgery; (2) to gain a better understanding of the pain experience from the child's perspective, how it was defined, remembered and discussed. Background: Postoperative pain is experienced by millions of children every day worldwide. Developing clinically sensitive methods for comprehending children's pain is an important role of health care providers. The experience as described by the children experiencing pain has been under explored, creating a gap in literature and practice. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): This was a longitudinal, prospective, qualitative descriptive study using interviews and drawings with nine children ages 11 to 12 years, with scoliosis requiring surgery. They were interviewed in an outpatient orthopedic department before surgery and after surgery. The children were asked questions, drew pictures of themselves and described their pictures. The first visit was 15 minutes while the second 20 minutes on average. The analytic process served to uncover each child's perception of her or his experience which occurred with content analysis. Results: The children were able to describe their perceptions of the acute postoperative pain experience freely when asked. They did not describe an overwhelming acute postoperative pain experience after spinal surgery. The emphasis by the children was missing their friends and interactions with them. There was an exaggerated dependence-independence struggle developmentally within each child as well as within the child-parent relationship. Conclusions and Implications: School-aged children who had spinal surgery have shown that they can share their responses and perceptions, communicate their thoughts and feelings and convey facts in a coherent and useful manner, regarding their acute postoperative pain experience, to a researcher. These children had pain but it was primarily due to imposed limitations on their activity, missing their friends and social activities.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSchool-Aged Children's Perceptions of Their Postoperative Experience After Spinal Fusion with Instrumentationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorShannon, Elizabeth G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorArnstein, Paulen_US
dc.contributor.authorMott, Sandraen_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth G. Shannon, RN, PhD(c), Children's Hospital Boston and Boston College, Dover, Massachusetts, USA, email: elizabeth.shannon@childrens.harvard.edu; Mary Duffy, PhD, RN, FAAN; Paul Arnstein, PhD, RNCS, FNP-C; Sandra Mott, PhD, RNCen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163178-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study had a two-fold purpose: (1) to describe how school-aged children perceived their experience, and responded to acute postoperative pain following spinal surgery; (2) to gain a better understanding of the pain experience from the child's perspective, how it was defined, remembered and discussed. Background: Postoperative pain is experienced by millions of children every day worldwide. Developing clinically sensitive methods for comprehending children's pain is an important role of health care providers. The experience as described by the children experiencing pain has been under explored, creating a gap in literature and practice. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): This was a longitudinal, prospective, qualitative descriptive study using interviews and drawings with nine children ages 11 to 12 years, with scoliosis requiring surgery. They were interviewed in an outpatient orthopedic department before surgery and after surgery. The children were asked questions, drew pictures of themselves and described their pictures. The first visit was 15 minutes while the second 20 minutes on average. The analytic process served to uncover each child's perception of her or his experience which occurred with content analysis. Results: The children were able to describe their perceptions of the acute postoperative pain experience freely when asked. They did not describe an overwhelming acute postoperative pain experience after spinal surgery. The emphasis by the children was missing their friends and interactions with them. There was an exaggerated dependence-independence struggle developmentally within each child as well as within the child-parent relationship. Conclusions and Implications: School-aged children who had spinal surgery have shown that they can share their responses and perceptions, communicate their thoughts and feelings and convey facts in a coherent and useful manner, regarding their acute postoperative pain experience, to a researcher. These children had pain but it was primarily due to imposed limitations on their activity, missing their friends and social activities.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:47Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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