Appraisal, Lifestyle Patterns, Coping and Types of Social Support Used by Women With Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163180
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Appraisal, Lifestyle Patterns, Coping and Types of Social Support Used by Women With Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Sternas, Kathleen A.; Beal, Judy A.
Author Details:
Kathleen A. Sternas, PhD, RN, Seton Hall University, College of Nursing, Verona, New Jersey, USA, email: sternaka@shu.edu; Judy A. Beal, DNSc, RN, Simmons College
Abstract:
Purpose: Breast cancer is perceived as a stressful experience. This study focused on factors which can impact on quality of life of women with breast cancer, namely, appraisal, lifestyle patterns, coping and social support. Theoretical Framework: Lazarus and Folkman's stress-appraisal-coping framework guided the study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): An explanation about the study was shared with younger(29 to 58,n=32) and older (60 to 80, n=15) women of African-American (n=15), Hispanic (n=2) or Caucasian (n=30) ethnicity, who were scheduled for breast surgery and referred by surgeons. Telephone follow-up was used to ascertain interest, and schedule a nurse interview if inclusion criteria were met. Measures: Appraisal of Breast Cancer Scale; Ways of Coping Revised; Assessment of Resources/Lifestyle Patterns; Social Support Questionnaire. Results: Perceived causes of breast cancer included poor eating habits, not caring for oneself, estrogens, stress, and breast injury. Women appraised breast cancer as a challenge with harmful losses. Challenges: maintaining self-esteem, feeling good emotionally, and staying active. African-Americans had more beneficial-positive appraisals than Caucasians (t=2.80,p=.008). Older women had more positive appraisals than younger women. Lifestyle patterns before breast cancer included: eating poorly, high caffeine/alcohol intake, little exercise, poor breast care practices. Women made positive lifestyle changes: implemented good nutrition; reduced caffeine/alcohol; quit smoking; exercised more; reduced stress; increased breast care practices; improved relationships. Helpful coping strategies: positive reappraisal, planful problem-solving, prayer, keeping busy, acceptance. African-Americans used more distancing than Caucasians (t=2.27,p=.029). Lumpectomy patients used more escape-avoidance than mastectomy patients (t=2.07,p< .05). Informational and emotional support were used more than tangible support. Women were satisfied with emotional support received and provided support to others. Conclusions and Implications: Women hold positive and negative meanings about breast cancer, initiate positive changes in lifestyle patterns, used a variety of coping strategies and types of support. African-Americans used more beneficial-positive appraisal and distancing than Caucasians. Implications include educating women about positive meanings, helpful coping strategies, support and healthy lifestyle patterns which can improve quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAppraisal, Lifestyle Patterns, Coping and Types of Social Support Used by Women With Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorSternas, Kathleen A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBeal, Judy A.en_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen A. Sternas, PhD, RN, Seton Hall University, College of Nursing, Verona, New Jersey, USA, email: sternaka@shu.edu; Judy A. Beal, DNSc, RN, Simmons Collegeen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163180-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Breast cancer is perceived as a stressful experience. This study focused on factors which can impact on quality of life of women with breast cancer, namely, appraisal, lifestyle patterns, coping and social support. Theoretical Framework: Lazarus and Folkman's stress-appraisal-coping framework guided the study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): An explanation about the study was shared with younger(29 to 58,n=32) and older (60 to 80, n=15) women of African-American (n=15), Hispanic (n=2) or Caucasian (n=30) ethnicity, who were scheduled for breast surgery and referred by surgeons. Telephone follow-up was used to ascertain interest, and schedule a nurse interview if inclusion criteria were met. Measures: Appraisal of Breast Cancer Scale; Ways of Coping Revised; Assessment of Resources/Lifestyle Patterns; Social Support Questionnaire. Results: Perceived causes of breast cancer included poor eating habits, not caring for oneself, estrogens, stress, and breast injury. Women appraised breast cancer as a challenge with harmful losses. Challenges: maintaining self-esteem, feeling good emotionally, and staying active. African-Americans had more beneficial-positive appraisals than Caucasians (t=2.80,p=.008). Older women had more positive appraisals than younger women. Lifestyle patterns before breast cancer included: eating poorly, high caffeine/alcohol intake, little exercise, poor breast care practices. Women made positive lifestyle changes: implemented good nutrition; reduced caffeine/alcohol; quit smoking; exercised more; reduced stress; increased breast care practices; improved relationships. Helpful coping strategies: positive reappraisal, planful problem-solving, prayer, keeping busy, acceptance. African-Americans used more distancing than Caucasians (t=2.27,p=.029). Lumpectomy patients used more escape-avoidance than mastectomy patients (t=2.07,p< .05). Informational and emotional support were used more than tangible support. Women were satisfied with emotional support received and provided support to others. Conclusions and Implications: Women hold positive and negative meanings about breast cancer, initiate positive changes in lifestyle patterns, used a variety of coping strategies and types of support. African-Americans used more beneficial-positive appraisal and distancing than Caucasians. Implications include educating women about positive meanings, helpful coping strategies, support and healthy lifestyle patterns which can improve quality of life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:49Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.