2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163181
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding Nursing Competence: a Metasynthesis
Author(s):
Strange, Sally Nelson; Clabo, Laurie M. Lauzon
Author Details:
Sally Nelson Strange, RN, MSN, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: sally.strange@huskymail.uconn.edu; Laurie M. Lauzon Clabo, PhD, RN, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this metasynthesis was to gain a greater comprehension and understanding of competence in nursing clinical practice. Background: Nurses' competence is the gold standard for verifying that patients receive safe care. In doing so, nurses must attain educational and clinical practice standards as well as high levels of competence. Such knowledge and skill have been described as contextual, requiring adaptation to changing organizational and role demands in complex patient care situations. The subjective nature of competence has created challenges in defining, assessing, and measuring it objectively. Healthcare organizations are accountable for ensuring patient safety by providing competent nursing care and search for a method that demonstrates nurses are practicing competently. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): The approach proposed by Noblit and Hare (1988) was used to conduct a metasynthesis of 10 qualitative studies addressing competence in clinical practice. A metasynthesis involves creating a whole into something more than the parts alone imply. Results: In synthesizing these studies, five overarching themes emerged, which represented competence in nursing practice as a series of progressive phases occurring over time. The phases included: (a) A basic foundation: Possessing the knowledge and skills, (b) Evolving competence: Increasing knowledge and confidence, (c) Revealing uncertainties: Asking questions and using resources, (d) A holistic perspective: Working in harmony, and (e) Beyond the self: Coaching, mentoring, and teaching others. Conclusions and Implications: An understanding of competence and the phases in which it is developed have important ramifications to patient safety and quality outcomes. These findings add to the literature on nursing competence by providing a framework by which educators and staff nurses can base training, orientation programs, and evaluation of clinical practice. The resulting themes have implications for future research in instrument and theory development.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding Nursing Competence: a Metasynthesisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStrange, Sally Nelsonen_US
dc.contributor.authorClabo, Laurie M. Lauzonen_US
dc.author.detailsSally Nelson Strange, RN, MSN, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: sally.strange@huskymail.uconn.edu; Laurie M. Lauzon Clabo, PhD, RN, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouthen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163181-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this metasynthesis was to gain a greater comprehension and understanding of competence in nursing clinical practice. Background: Nurses' competence is the gold standard for verifying that patients receive safe care. In doing so, nurses must attain educational and clinical practice standards as well as high levels of competence. Such knowledge and skill have been described as contextual, requiring adaptation to changing organizational and role demands in complex patient care situations. The subjective nature of competence has created challenges in defining, assessing, and measuring it objectively. Healthcare organizations are accountable for ensuring patient safety by providing competent nursing care and search for a method that demonstrates nurses are practicing competently. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): The approach proposed by Noblit and Hare (1988) was used to conduct a metasynthesis of 10 qualitative studies addressing competence in clinical practice. A metasynthesis involves creating a whole into something more than the parts alone imply. Results: In synthesizing these studies, five overarching themes emerged, which represented competence in nursing practice as a series of progressive phases occurring over time. The phases included: (a) A basic foundation: Possessing the knowledge and skills, (b) Evolving competence: Increasing knowledge and confidence, (c) Revealing uncertainties: Asking questions and using resources, (d) A holistic perspective: Working in harmony, and (e) Beyond the self: Coaching, mentoring, and teaching others. Conclusions and Implications: An understanding of competence and the phases in which it is developed have important ramifications to patient safety and quality outcomes. These findings add to the literature on nursing competence by providing a framework by which educators and staff nurses can base training, orientation programs, and evaluation of clinical practice. The resulting themes have implications for future research in instrument and theory development.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:50Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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