Women's Experiences of Managing Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis with Injectable Immunomodulator Therapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163186
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's Experiences of Managing Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis with Injectable Immunomodulator Therapy
Author(s):
Terrill, Eileen F.
Author Details:
Eileen F. Terrill, University of Massachusetts-Worcester Graduate School of Nursing, Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, USA, email: eileen.terrill@umassmed.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To describe the experiences of managing relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) among adult women who were using injectable immunomodulator (IIM) therapy, including day-to-day management, barriers to treatment, medication beliefs, and health care provider influence. Background: Current guidelines recommend immediate and sustained treatment with newly approved IIM medications. However, despite the benefits associated with IIM, approximately 42% of patients are not using them. Little is known about IIM from the patient's perspective. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): A qualitative descriptive study was conducted with 32 women, aged 32-66, using in depth, audiotaped interviews. Participants were recruited through purposive sampling from an MS clinic and a neurology practice, as well as snowball sampling. Participants included women currently undergoing therapy (N=25) and those who had stopped therapy (N= 6). The majority of women were Caucasian (94%). One woman who chose not to start IIM therapy was recruited to provide a negative case comparison. The average length of time with RRMS was 8 years, and average time on treatment was 3 years. Content analysis was used to derive themes and patterns from within and across categories. Results: Findings indicate two themes influence women's beliefs about IIM therapy: concrete experiences (with side effects, injection issues, or worsening disease), and perceptions about the efficacy of the IIM. These contributed to women's attitudes towards treatment necessity and concerns regarding treatment. Further, participants identified health care provider behaviors that influenced their decisions regarding IIM therapy, including attentive listening, information sharing, and shared decision-making. Conclusions and Implications: Data reveal that women's management of RRMS, including decisions about IIM, are influenced by concrete experiences, personal beliefs, and health care provider behaviors. It is important to develop an understanding of women's experiences of managing RRMS among users and nonusers of IIM medications in order for health care providers to provide ongoing education, counseling, and support.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's Experiences of Managing Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis with Injectable Immunomodulator Therapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTerrill, Eileen F.en_US
dc.author.detailsEileen F. Terrill, University of Massachusetts-Worcester Graduate School of Nursing, Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, USA, email: eileen.terrill@umassmed.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163186-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To describe the experiences of managing relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) among adult women who were using injectable immunomodulator (IIM) therapy, including day-to-day management, barriers to treatment, medication beliefs, and health care provider influence. Background: Current guidelines recommend immediate and sustained treatment with newly approved IIM medications. However, despite the benefits associated with IIM, approximately 42% of patients are not using them. Little is known about IIM from the patient's perspective. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): A qualitative descriptive study was conducted with 32 women, aged 32-66, using in depth, audiotaped interviews. Participants were recruited through purposive sampling from an MS clinic and a neurology practice, as well as snowball sampling. Participants included women currently undergoing therapy (N=25) and those who had stopped therapy (N= 6). The majority of women were Caucasian (94%). One woman who chose not to start IIM therapy was recruited to provide a negative case comparison. The average length of time with RRMS was 8 years, and average time on treatment was 3 years. Content analysis was used to derive themes and patterns from within and across categories. Results: Findings indicate two themes influence women's beliefs about IIM therapy: concrete experiences (with side effects, injection issues, or worsening disease), and perceptions about the efficacy of the IIM. These contributed to women's attitudes towards treatment necessity and concerns regarding treatment. Further, participants identified health care provider behaviors that influenced their decisions regarding IIM therapy, including attentive listening, information sharing, and shared decision-making. Conclusions and Implications: Data reveal that women's management of RRMS, including decisions about IIM, are influenced by concrete experiences, personal beliefs, and health care provider behaviors. It is important to develop an understanding of women's experiences of managing RRMS among users and nonusers of IIM medications in order for health care providers to provide ongoing education, counseling, and support.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:56Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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