2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163187
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychometric Properties of the Measure of Job Satisfaction Instrument
Author(s):
Tourangeau, Ann E.; Widger, Kimberley; McGilton, Katherine; Wodchis, Walter; Teare, Gary
Author Details:
Ann E. Tourangeau, RN, PhD, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, email: ann.tourangeau@utoronto.ca; Kimberley Widger, RN, MSCN; Katherine McGilton, RN, PhD; Walter Wodchis, PhD; Gary Teare, PhD
Abstract:
Psychometric properties of the Measure of Job Satisfaction instrument (MJS) used to measure job satisfaction for a sample of nursing and interdisciplinary clinical staff working in complex continuing care hospital environments. Theoretical Framework: Needs are physiological or psychological desires that motivate individuals to satisfy these needs by acquiring rewards or achieving goals. Job satisfaction is conceptualized as related to rewards in three distinct domains: safety, social and psychological. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): The MJS was administered to 162 nursing and other clinical staff working in complex continuing care hospital settings in Ontario, Canada. First, confirmatory factor analysis was implemented to replicate a five factor solution previously reported. Second, exploratory factor analysis using varimax rotation was conducted. Reliabilities of the newly derived factors were calculated. New subscale scores were correlated with subscales of other instruments to establish MJS validity. Results: Confirmatory factor analysis was unable to replicate a five factor solution previously reported. We, therefore, implemented exploratory factor. This analysis yielded nine factors including 28-items and explained 72% of variance. Based on the content of items in each new factor we named the nine factors: workload, quality of care, professional support, professional stimulation, team, professional development, compensation, future career, and job security. Reliabilities of the new subscales ranged from 0.59 - 0.91. As predicted, further evidence of validity of the MJS was demonstrated when new MJS subscale scores were found to be significantly correlated with other measures of job satisfaction and were negatively correlated with emotional exhaustion. Conclusions and Implications: The MJS is a reliable and valid measure of job satisfaction within the complex continuing care environments. Our findings suggest that the length of this instrument can be reduced from 41 to 28 items and both reliably and validly measure job satisfaction.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychometric Properties of the Measure of Job Satisfaction Instrumenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorTourangeau, Ann E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWidger, Kimberleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGilton, Katherineen_US
dc.contributor.authorWodchis, Walteren_US
dc.contributor.authorTeare, Garyen_US
dc.author.detailsAnn E. Tourangeau, RN, PhD, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, email: ann.tourangeau@utoronto.ca; Kimberley Widger, RN, MSCN; Katherine McGilton, RN, PhD; Walter Wodchis, PhD; Gary Teare, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163187-
dc.description.abstractPsychometric properties of the Measure of Job Satisfaction instrument (MJS) used to measure job satisfaction for a sample of nursing and interdisciplinary clinical staff working in complex continuing care hospital environments. Theoretical Framework: Needs are physiological or psychological desires that motivate individuals to satisfy these needs by acquiring rewards or achieving goals. Job satisfaction is conceptualized as related to rewards in three distinct domains: safety, social and psychological. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): The MJS was administered to 162 nursing and other clinical staff working in complex continuing care hospital settings in Ontario, Canada. First, confirmatory factor analysis was implemented to replicate a five factor solution previously reported. Second, exploratory factor analysis using varimax rotation was conducted. Reliabilities of the newly derived factors were calculated. New subscale scores were correlated with subscales of other instruments to establish MJS validity. Results: Confirmatory factor analysis was unable to replicate a five factor solution previously reported. We, therefore, implemented exploratory factor. This analysis yielded nine factors including 28-items and explained 72% of variance. Based on the content of items in each new factor we named the nine factors: workload, quality of care, professional support, professional stimulation, team, professional development, compensation, future career, and job security. Reliabilities of the new subscales ranged from 0.59 - 0.91. As predicted, further evidence of validity of the MJS was demonstrated when new MJS subscale scores were found to be significantly correlated with other measures of job satisfaction and were negatively correlated with emotional exhaustion. Conclusions and Implications: The MJS is a reliable and valid measure of job satisfaction within the complex continuing care environments. Our findings suggest that the length of this instrument can be reduced from 41 to 28 items and both reliably and validly measure job satisfaction.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:02:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:02:57Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.