African American Women and Depression: Articulation, Conceptualization and Management from a Socio-Cultural Context

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163191
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
African American Women and Depression: Articulation, Conceptualization and Management from a Socio-Cultural Context
Author(s):
Waite, Roberta
Author Details:
Roberta Waite, EdD, RN, MSN, CS, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: rlw26@drexel.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to promote understanding of depression from the perspective of African American women (AAW). The aims were threefold: 1) Describe how these AAW articulate and conceptualize depression within their socio-cultural context; 2) Identify the severity of depression among these women; and 3) Describe the subjective experience of these women living with and managing depression in their daily life. Background: Depression is a chronic and disabling illness that goes undetected in many AAW. Both immediate and long-term effects of misdiagnoses and under-diagnoses of depression have implications for increased incidence and prevalence of psychiatric and medical disorders. There is a gap in understanding how AAW articulate and conceptualize depression. Moreover the subjective experience of depression among AAW is poorly understood. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): A qualitative study that used an exploratory descriptive design with purposeful sampling was conducted with 36 urban AAW who self identified as having been diagnosed with depression. Recruitment occurred at a nurse managed community health center located in an urban city in the Northeast region of the United States. Focus groups were the primary source of qualitative data which were analyzed using content analysis and open coding with Atlas/ti 5.0. A demographic survey and the PRIME MD Patient Health Questionnaire-9 provided quantitative findings. Results: Eighty-nine percent of the participants currently report experiencing mild to severe depression. Results included 3 main themes and corresponding sub-themes: enduring the experience (describing it, the struggle); revealing distress (the hidden self), and coping (personal reframing, faith: the power of prayer). Conclusions and Implications: AAW's accounts of their depressive experiences point to the significance of understanding depression from an ethno-socio-cultural perspective. The implications serve to promote sensitivity to language used when assessing depression among AAW. Also to understand the role of cultural and religious/spiritual influences in how AAW experience and manage depression in their everyday life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAfrican American Women and Depression: Articulation, Conceptualization and Management from a Socio-Cultural Contexten_GB
dc.contributor.authorWaite, Robertaen_US
dc.author.detailsRoberta Waite, EdD, RN, MSN, CS, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: rlw26@drexel.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163191-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The primary objective of this study was to promote understanding of depression from the perspective of African American women (AAW). The aims were threefold: 1) Describe how these AAW articulate and conceptualize depression within their socio-cultural context; 2) Identify the severity of depression among these women; and 3) Describe the subjective experience of these women living with and managing depression in their daily life. Background: Depression is a chronic and disabling illness that goes undetected in many AAW. Both immediate and long-term effects of misdiagnoses and under-diagnoses of depression have implications for increased incidence and prevalence of psychiatric and medical disorders. There is a gap in understanding how AAW articulate and conceptualize depression. Moreover the subjective experience of depression among AAW is poorly understood. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): A qualitative study that used an exploratory descriptive design with purposeful sampling was conducted with 36 urban AAW who self identified as having been diagnosed with depression. Recruitment occurred at a nurse managed community health center located in an urban city in the Northeast region of the United States. Focus groups were the primary source of qualitative data which were analyzed using content analysis and open coding with Atlas/ti 5.0. A demographic survey and the PRIME MD Patient Health Questionnaire-9 provided quantitative findings. Results: Eighty-nine percent of the participants currently report experiencing mild to severe depression. Results included 3 main themes and corresponding sub-themes: enduring the experience (describing it, the struggle); revealing distress (the hidden self), and coping (personal reframing, faith: the power of prayer). Conclusions and Implications: AAW's accounts of their depressive experiences point to the significance of understanding depression from an ethno-socio-cultural perspective. The implications serve to promote sensitivity to language used when assessing depression among AAW. Also to understand the role of cultural and religious/spiritual influences in how AAW experience and manage depression in their everyday life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:01Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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