2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163192
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A concept analysis of self-monitoring
Author(s):
Wilde, Mary H.; Garvin, Suzanne
Author Details:
Mary H. Wilde, PhD, RN, University of Rochester, Whitesboro, New York, USA, email: mary_wilde@urmc.rochester.edu; Suzanne Garvin, RN, BS, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Abstract:
Purpose: The aim of this concept analysis is to delineate and clarify the concept of self-monitoring to facilitate development and evaluation of interventions to enhance self-monitoring. Background: The concepts of self-monitoring, self-management, self-care, and symptom management are often used in similar or interchangeable ways. Clarification of the concept of self-monitoring is needed for research and theory development. Approach: Rogers and Knafl's evolutionary concept analysis process was used to delineate and clarify the concept. The PubMed and CINAHL databases were searched using keywords 'self-monitoring', 'self-management,' and 'self-care' for the years 1998-2005, to update a previous study with recently published work. Later, searching was refined and the keyword 'self-monitoring' was paired with 'awareness,' and 'self-regulation' was added. Approximately half the papers were from nursing (n=34) and half from other disciplines (n=32). The sample from 1998-2005 was further stratified by chronic condition. Definition, exemplars, usage, attributes, antecedents/consequences, and implications for further study were identified. Major Points & Rationale: Self-monitoring was composed of two complementary components (attributes): 1) awareness of bodily symptoms, sensations, daily activities, and cognitive processes and 2) measurements, recordings, and observations that inform cognition or provide information for independent action or consultation with care providers. Conclusions: Self-monitoring may be an important concept for understanding how people self-manage chronic conditions. This concept analysis may be useful for researchers who wish to measure this dimension and to develop nursing theory in this area.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA concept analysis of self-monitoringen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilde, Mary H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGarvin, Suzanneen_US
dc.author.detailsMary H. Wilde, PhD, RN, University of Rochester, Whitesboro, New York, USA, email: mary_wilde@urmc.rochester.edu; Suzanne Garvin, RN, BS, University of Massachusetts Amhersten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163192-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The aim of this concept analysis is to delineate and clarify the concept of self-monitoring to facilitate development and evaluation of interventions to enhance self-monitoring. Background: The concepts of self-monitoring, self-management, self-care, and symptom management are often used in similar or interchangeable ways. Clarification of the concept of self-monitoring is needed for research and theory development. Approach: Rogers and Knafl's evolutionary concept analysis process was used to delineate and clarify the concept. The PubMed and CINAHL databases were searched using keywords 'self-monitoring', 'self-management,' and 'self-care' for the years 1998-2005, to update a previous study with recently published work. Later, searching was refined and the keyword 'self-monitoring' was paired with 'awareness,' and 'self-regulation' was added. Approximately half the papers were from nursing (n=34) and half from other disciplines (n=32). The sample from 1998-2005 was further stratified by chronic condition. Definition, exemplars, usage, attributes, antecedents/consequences, and implications for further study were identified. Major Points & Rationale: Self-monitoring was composed of two complementary components (attributes): 1) awareness of bodily symptoms, sensations, daily activities, and cognitive processes and 2) measurements, recordings, and observations that inform cognition or provide information for independent action or consultation with care providers. Conclusions: Self-monitoring may be an important concept for understanding how people self-manage chronic conditions. This concept analysis may be useful for researchers who wish to measure this dimension and to develop nursing theory in this area.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:02Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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