Demographic Characteristics of Postpartum Women Associated with Clinicians' Asking about their Emotional State

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163194
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Demographic Characteristics of Postpartum Women Associated with Clinicians' Asking about their Emotional State
Author(s):
Wojcik, Joanne Doller; Pulcini, Joyce; Gregory, Katherine E.; Murphy, Christine; Horowitz, June Andrews
Author Details:
Joanne D. Wojcik, MS, APRN, BC, Boston College, Watertown, Massachusetts, USA, email: jwojcik@bidmc.harvard.edu; Joyce Pulcini, PhD, APRN, BC; Katherine E. Gregory, RN, PhD; Christine Murphy, RN, PhD; June Andrews Horowitz, PhD, APRN, FAAN
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose was to examine if demographic characteristics of postpartum women were associated with clinicians' asking about their emotional state based on experience from the CARE (Communicating And Relating Effectively) Study. Theoretical Framework: The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality framework informs this study. The pathway begins with identifying a cohort of postpartum women with unknown mood state and moves to depression symptom screening. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A descriptive design was used to identify a community-based sample of women with elevated postpartum depression (PPD) symptoms. After giving birth at a Partners Healthcare hospital in Boston, 1,716 women gave permission for PPD screening at 4 weeks. CARE study nurses administered the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and asked about maternal age, education level, race and ethnicity, and parity. Chi-square analyses were used to examine associations between demographic characteristics and being asked about emotional status. Results: Only 48.7% of women reported being asked about their emotional state: 38.5% were not asked and 12.8% had not been seen by a clinician. Age, education, and race and ethnicity were not associated with whether or not women were asked about how they were feeling emotionally. However, parity had a significant association with being asked: multiparous women were asked less frequently than were primiparous women (41.6% versus 56.4%, p < .000). In addition, first-time mothers were almost twice as likely as mothers with other children to have been seen by a clinician at 4 weeks (9.1% to16.1%, p < .000). Conclusions and Implications: Results suggest that clinicians were not biased in relation to demographic characteristics when asking about emotional state, except in terms of parity. Clinicians made fewer inquiries to women with other children than to primiparous women. Greater awareness on the part of clinicians concerning PPD risk and importance of early detection is warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDemographic Characteristics of Postpartum Women Associated with Clinicians' Asking about their Emotional Stateen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWojcik, Joanne Dolleren_US
dc.contributor.authorPulcini, Joyceen_US
dc.contributor.authorGregory, Katherine E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Christineen_US
dc.contributor.authorHorowitz, June Andrewsen_US
dc.author.detailsJoanne D. Wojcik, MS, APRN, BC, Boston College, Watertown, Massachusetts, USA, email: jwojcik@bidmc.harvard.edu; Joyce Pulcini, PhD, APRN, BC; Katherine E. Gregory, RN, PhD; Christine Murphy, RN, PhD; June Andrews Horowitz, PhD, APRN, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163194-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose was to examine if demographic characteristics of postpartum women were associated with clinicians' asking about their emotional state based on experience from the CARE (Communicating And Relating Effectively) Study. Theoretical Framework: The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality framework informs this study. The pathway begins with identifying a cohort of postpartum women with unknown mood state and moves to depression symptom screening. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A descriptive design was used to identify a community-based sample of women with elevated postpartum depression (PPD) symptoms. After giving birth at a Partners Healthcare hospital in Boston, 1,716 women gave permission for PPD screening at 4 weeks. CARE study nurses administered the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and asked about maternal age, education level, race and ethnicity, and parity. Chi-square analyses were used to examine associations between demographic characteristics and being asked about emotional status. Results: Only 48.7% of women reported being asked about their emotional state: 38.5% were not asked and 12.8% had not been seen by a clinician. Age, education, and race and ethnicity were not associated with whether or not women were asked about how they were feeling emotionally. However, parity had a significant association with being asked: multiparous women were asked less frequently than were primiparous women (41.6% versus 56.4%, p < .000). In addition, first-time mothers were almost twice as likely as mothers with other children to have been seen by a clinician at 4 weeks (9.1% to16.1%, p < .000). Conclusions and Implications: Results suggest that clinicians were not biased in relation to demographic characteristics when asking about emotional state, except in terms of parity. Clinicians made fewer inquiries to women with other children than to primiparous women. Greater awareness on the part of clinicians concerning PPD risk and importance of early detection is warranted.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:05Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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