2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163196
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptom Clusters Predict Functional Status in Patients with Heart Failure
Author(s):
Jurgens, Corrine Y.; Moser, Debra K.; Zambroski, Cheryl H.; Lennie, Terry; Carlson, Beverly; Riegel, Barbara
Author Details:
Corrine Y. Jurgens, PhD RN CS ANP, Clinical Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Stony Brook, New York, USA, email: corrine.jurgens@stonybrook.edu; Debra K. Moser, DNSc RN FAAN; Cheryl H. Zambroski, PhD RN; Terry Lennie, PhD RN; Beverly Carlson, MS RN CNS CCRN; Barbara Riegel, DNSc RN CS FAAN
Abstract:
Purpose: Persons with heart failure (HF) have great difficulty recognizing and labeling their HF symptoms. Identification of symptom clusters may help them recognize symptoms that require self-care. Symptom clusters have been defined in cancer but not in HF. Symptom clusters were defined as three or more concurrent symptoms that are related and have an adverse impact. Our purpose was to describe the number, type, and combination of HF symptoms and identify the impact of these clusters on functional status. Theoretical Framework: The Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms informed this study. It specifies the importance of viewing the symptom experience as multidimensional in nature with the potential interaction of multiple symptoms. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Four unique, existing datasets were analyzed with factor analysis. Only clusters experienced by 10% or more of subjects were kept. The first sample included 201 HF patients hospitalized emergently for symptom management (56% male, mean age 71 years). Symptoms were measured using the HF Somatic Awareness Scale. The second sample consisted of 231 HF patients hospitalized for HF symptom management (51% male, mean age 72). Symptoms were measured using the Minnesota Living with HF Questionnaire (MLHFQ). The third sample of 69 chronic HF patients was recruited from a HF clinic (58% male, mean age 62). Symptoms experienced on one full day were measured with a symptom diary. The fourth sample of 53 chronic HF patients was recruited from a clinic (66% male, mean age 56). Symptoms were measured using MLHFQ. Results: Seven unique clusters were identified. Clusters did not differ in a meaningful way between acutely and chronically ill samples. Fatigue was common and clustered primarily with items reflecting volume overload. Physical symptom clusters predicted functional status in a regression model explaining 10 to 21% of the variance in physical functioning. Conclusions and Implications: Knowledge of symptom clusters may improve the ability of patients to recognize signs of imminent decline.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptom Clusters Predict Functional Status in Patients with Heart Failureen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJurgens, Corrine Y.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMoser, Debra K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZambroski, Cheryl H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLennie, Terryen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarlson, Beverlyen_US
dc.contributor.authorRiegel, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsCorrine Y. Jurgens, PhD RN CS ANP, Clinical Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Stony Brook, New York, USA, email: corrine.jurgens@stonybrook.edu; Debra K. Moser, DNSc RN FAAN; Cheryl H. Zambroski, PhD RN; Terry Lennie, PhD RN; Beverly Carlson, MS RN CNS CCRN; Barbara Riegel, DNSc RN CS FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163196-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Persons with heart failure (HF) have great difficulty recognizing and labeling their HF symptoms. Identification of symptom clusters may help them recognize symptoms that require self-care. Symptom clusters have been defined in cancer but not in HF. Symptom clusters were defined as three or more concurrent symptoms that are related and have an adverse impact. Our purpose was to describe the number, type, and combination of HF symptoms and identify the impact of these clusters on functional status. Theoretical Framework: The Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms informed this study. It specifies the importance of viewing the symptom experience as multidimensional in nature with the potential interaction of multiple symptoms. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Four unique, existing datasets were analyzed with factor analysis. Only clusters experienced by 10% or more of subjects were kept. The first sample included 201 HF patients hospitalized emergently for symptom management (56% male, mean age 71 years). Symptoms were measured using the HF Somatic Awareness Scale. The second sample consisted of 231 HF patients hospitalized for HF symptom management (51% male, mean age 72). Symptoms were measured using the Minnesota Living with HF Questionnaire (MLHFQ). The third sample of 69 chronic HF patients was recruited from a HF clinic (58% male, mean age 62). Symptoms experienced on one full day were measured with a symptom diary. The fourth sample of 53 chronic HF patients was recruited from a clinic (66% male, mean age 56). Symptoms were measured using MLHFQ. Results: Seven unique clusters were identified. Clusters did not differ in a meaningful way between acutely and chronically ill samples. Fatigue was common and clustered primarily with items reflecting volume overload. Physical symptom clusters predicted functional status in a regression model explaining 10 to 21% of the variance in physical functioning. Conclusions and Implications: Knowledge of symptom clusters may improve the ability of patients to recognize signs of imminent decline.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:07Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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