2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163199
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Do Nurses Really Care about their Patients?
Author(s):
Khalil, Doris Deedei
Author Details:
Dr. Doris Deedei Khalil, PHD MA BA RN, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Division of Nursing & Midwifery, Cape Town, South Africa, email: dkhalil@uctgsh1.uct.ac.za
Abstract:
Purpose: The sub-aim of the study was to examine the extent of covert/overt violence against patients exist in nursing practice. Background: it is very distressing to hear reports of violence by nurses against patients. Nurses are trained to be compassionate and act as advocate for health care consumers. Yet increasing minority group of nurses continues to bring the profession into disrepute through their actions. As part of a study on violence in nursing, violence by nurses against patients and their relatives was examined. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Study design: ethno-phenomenological design was selected to study the culture of nursing that permits minority of nurses to abuse patients and their relatives. Method of data collection: confidential survey of all nurses employed in the public sector; interviews, and official documents review. Analysis: statistical and qualitative analysis of responses from survey and interviews, official documents will be analysed to determine incidences of unexplained injuries to patients, and actions taken for redress. Results: initial results indicated that nurses had been aware of reports of mistreatment of patients by some their colleagues either because patients were perceived to be 'uncooperative', 'difficult' or 'rude and abusive'. Covert violence against patients were difficult to determine but most respondents indicated that ignoring or delaying patients' requests for assistance were some of the strategies employed by minority of nurses to 'punish' difficult patients. Conclusions and Implications: Implication for practice: covert and overt violence against patients and their relatives contravene nursing ethics and professional code of practice. It is socially unacceptable and where such information is brought to the attention of management, the perpetrator is disciplined or dismissed for gross negligence. The study is still in progress.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Sponsors:
This study is funded by UCT Faculty of Health and the South African Medical Research Council.
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDo Nurses Really Care about their Patients?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorKhalil, Doris Deedeien_US
dc.author.detailsDr. Doris Deedei Khalil, PHD MA BA RN, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Division of Nursing & Midwifery, Cape Town, South Africa, email: dkhalil@uctgsh1.uct.ac.zaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163199-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The sub-aim of the study was to examine the extent of covert/overt violence against patients exist in nursing practice. Background: it is very distressing to hear reports of violence by nurses against patients. Nurses are trained to be compassionate and act as advocate for health care consumers. Yet increasing minority group of nurses continues to bring the profession into disrepute through their actions. As part of a study on violence in nursing, violence by nurses against patients and their relatives was examined. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Study design: ethno-phenomenological design was selected to study the culture of nursing that permits minority of nurses to abuse patients and their relatives. Method of data collection: confidential survey of all nurses employed in the public sector; interviews, and official documents review. Analysis: statistical and qualitative analysis of responses from survey and interviews, official documents will be analysed to determine incidences of unexplained injuries to patients, and actions taken for redress. Results: initial results indicated that nurses had been aware of reports of mistreatment of patients by some their colleagues either because patients were perceived to be 'uncooperative', 'difficult' or 'rude and abusive'. Covert violence against patients were difficult to determine but most respondents indicated that ignoring or delaying patients' requests for assistance were some of the strategies employed by minority of nurses to 'punish' difficult patients. Conclusions and Implications: Implication for practice: covert and overt violence against patients and their relatives contravene nursing ethics and professional code of practice. It is socially unacceptable and where such information is brought to the attention of management, the perpetrator is disciplined or dismissed for gross negligence. The study is still in progress.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:10Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study is funded by UCT Faculty of Health and the South African Medical Research Council.en_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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