Concordance of Self Report and Staff Assessment of Emotional Well-Being in Nursing Home Residents With Dementia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163200
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Concordance of Self Report and Staff Assessment of Emotional Well-Being in Nursing Home Residents With Dementia
Author(s):
Kolanowski, Ann; Hoffman, Lesa; Hofer, Scott
Author Details:
Ann Kolanowski, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor, Pennsylvania State University, School of Nursing, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: amk20@psu.edu; Lesa Hoffman, PhD; Scott Hofer, PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: Emotional functioning in persons with dementia (PWD) is important to assess. In this study we used baseline data from a clinical trial to: 1) investigate the reliability and variability of self-reported mood in PWD and 2) examine the influence of mental status and physical dependence on the relationship between self-reported mood and staff rated affect in nursing home residents with dementia. Theoretical Framework: Individuals vary widely in the amount of positive and negative mood they report on a daily basis, accounting for individual differences and daily within person fluctuations in mood. For this reason, concordance of daily self-reports of mood by residents and staff ratings of affect is important to model on two levels: inter-individual differences (between person model) and intra-individual change over time (within person model). Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Thirty one nursing home residents with dementia were videotaped for 20 minutes each day over a 12-day baseline period of a clinical trial. Before and after each session residents were asked to rate their mood using the Dementia Mood Picture Test. Measures of affect were taken from the videotapes by trained staff using the Affective Rating Scale. Multilevel models were estimated using maximum likelihood in order to examine between- and within- person variation in mood and affect. Results: Positive affect was more stable than negative affect (ICC= .61, .39 respectively). Positive mood and negative mood were similar in stability (ICC= .54, .59 respectively). There was a significant positive within person correlation between staff rated negative affect and resident self-reported negative mood (r= .2). Residents with greater mental function and less physical dependence had less daily variation in positive and negative mood, and negative affect. Conclusions and Implications: Staff and residents demonstrate some concordance with respect to residents' negative emotionality but not with their positive emotionality. Greater resident frailty is associated with greater daily fluctuations in emotionality.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConcordance of Self Report and Staff Assessment of Emotional Well-Being in Nursing Home Residents With Dementiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKolanowski, Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorHoffman, Lesaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHofer, Scotten_US
dc.author.detailsAnn Kolanowski, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor, Pennsylvania State University, School of Nursing, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: amk20@psu.edu; Lesa Hoffman, PhD; Scott Hofer, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163200-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Emotional functioning in persons with dementia (PWD) is important to assess. In this study we used baseline data from a clinical trial to: 1) investigate the reliability and variability of self-reported mood in PWD and 2) examine the influence of mental status and physical dependence on the relationship between self-reported mood and staff rated affect in nursing home residents with dementia. Theoretical Framework: Individuals vary widely in the amount of positive and negative mood they report on a daily basis, accounting for individual differences and daily within person fluctuations in mood. For this reason, concordance of daily self-reports of mood by residents and staff ratings of affect is important to model on two levels: inter-individual differences (between person model) and intra-individual change over time (within person model). Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Thirty one nursing home residents with dementia were videotaped for 20 minutes each day over a 12-day baseline period of a clinical trial. Before and after each session residents were asked to rate their mood using the Dementia Mood Picture Test. Measures of affect were taken from the videotapes by trained staff using the Affective Rating Scale. Multilevel models were estimated using maximum likelihood in order to examine between- and within- person variation in mood and affect. Results: Positive affect was more stable than negative affect (ICC= .61, .39 respectively). Positive mood and negative mood were similar in stability (ICC= .54, .59 respectively). There was a significant positive within person correlation between staff rated negative affect and resident self-reported negative mood (r= .2). Residents with greater mental function and less physical dependence had less daily variation in positive and negative mood, and negative affect. Conclusions and Implications: Staff and residents demonstrate some concordance with respect to residents' negative emotionality but not with their positive emotionality. Greater resident frailty is associated with greater daily fluctuations in emotionality.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:11Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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